What is the volume, diversity and nature of recent systematic reviews about the use of remote monitoring interventions for adults living with long-term physical health conditions?

Remote monitoring for long-term physical health conditions: an evidence and gap map

Status: Ongoing

Background

Remote monitoring allows health care professionals to assess and manage the health of a patient, without the need for the patient to be seen face-to-face. This may involve the use of technologies such as wearable or assistive home devices e.g. blood pressure monitors or fall sensors, offering opportunities for innovation in the health care system. Remote monitoring could contribute to effective self-management and the delivery of personalised care as well as increasing efficiency and reducing health care costs.

We have been commissioned by NHS@home to produce an evidence and gap map of recent systematic reviews on the effectiveness of remote monitoring, and its acceptability and implementation, for people living with long term physical health conditions.

Aim of our project

This project aims to identify and provide an overview of recent systematic reviews of remote monitoring for people living with long-term physical health conditions.

Our specific research objectives are to:

  • Map recent systematic reviews of the effectiveness of remote monitoring interventions for adults living with long-term physical health conditions.
  • Map recent systematic reviews of the acceptability and implementation of remote monitoring interventions for adults living with long-term physical health conditions.

Research question

What is the volume, diversity and nature of recent systematic reviews about the use of remote monitoring interventions for adults living with long-term physical health conditions?

What we are doing

We will produce an evidence and gap map. Evidence and gap maps provide a visual overview of the current research on a topic. Rather than synthesising findings or research, evidence and gap maps summarise key characteristics of existing studies, allowing users to identify and access the research evidence (or see the evidence gaps) most relevant to them.

How we are doing it

We will search ten bibliographic databases as well as conducting web searches for relevant studies. We will look for systematic reviews with searches conducted in, or after, 2012. We will include reviews that focus on adults with a long-term physical health condition(s) and consider any form of remote monitoring, as long as data from monitoring is being passed to a health care professional.

We are interested in all outcomes relating to effectiveness, acceptability and implementation. For reviews of effectiveness, we will include only those containing comparative evaluation study designs e.g. randomised controlled trials, whilst for acceptability and implementation we will include reviews focusing on any study design.

We will produce an interactive evidence and gap map – this will visually represent the key characteristics of the included studies. The map will show key outcome domains as columns and key intervention domains as rows, with multiple layers to allow access to more detailed information on the studies containing information on particular combinations of outcomes and interventions. It will also be possible to filter the map e.g. to focus on specific populations.

For more detailed information about what we are planning to do, please see our project protocol.

Plans for sharing our findings

As well as publishing an interactive evidence and gap map and an HS&DR Web Topic Report, we will produce a briefing paper and aim to publish the map in a relevant peer-reviewed journal. Please check this web page or follow us on Twitter @ExEvidSC for updates.

If you have any feedback or comments about this review, please email Sian de Bell sd.c.de-bell@exeter.ac.uk or Rob Anderson r.anderson@exeter.ac.uk.