Past Events 2021

Date  TimeTitleDescriptionLocation
26th November 2021  1-2.30pm Qualitative Research Forum

Qualitative Research Forum: an informal group for staff and students doing qualitative research

About this event
The Qualitative Research Forum, based in the Institute for Health Research, for staff and students doing qualitative research in some capacity, was launched in September 2020, organised by Julia Frost, Jo Day, Cornelia Guell, Sarah Bell and Sarah Morgan-Trimmer. It will meet once every two months, alternately hosted by Exeter and Truro.

Rigour in Qualitative Research
The sixth meeting will be on Friday, 26th November 2021 from 13:00 to 14:30 hours by Zoom, with a focus on Rigour in Qualitative Research, with our fantastic guest speaker, Professor Brett Smith, Durham University.

Brett Smith is a Professor of Disability and Physical Activity in the Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences at Durham University. He currently leads the ‘Moving Social Work’ project that is funded by the NIHR and Sport England. He also is the Chair of the Disability and Physical Activity Expert Working Group for the Chief Medical Officers’ (CMOs) Disability and Physical Activity Guidelines. Brett is the President of the International Society of Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise. He is also the founding and former Editor of the journal Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health.

Rigour in qualitative research: Qualitative research needs to be held to high and difficult standards. It needs to be rigorous. But how might we understand rigour? What can researchers do to enhance the rigour of their research? What criteria might researchers and peers use to judge the quality of the research and hold it to difficult standards?

This talk grapples with such questions. The argument is presented that rigour needs to considered not in foundational or checklist ways but instead as part of a non-foundational list of characterising traits. Different criteria for supporting rigorous qualitative research is offered as part of an ongoing list and to support the practical application of judging qualitative research.  

Please note that these events are only open to members of staff and students at the University of Exeter.

To book, please visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qualitative-research-forum-tickets-167594466561

 
23rd November 2021  12-12.45pm  Seminar Statistical aspects of three school-based cluster randomised trials with mental health outcomes
Obi Ukoumunne

Obi Ukoumunne will describe three school-based cluster randomised trials of interventions for improving pupil mental health outcomes that the PenARC statisticians are currently collaborating on, with a focus on methodological aspects of these studies.

Book here

Please note that this talk will be recorded and the recording will be shared publicly via the PenARC website and PenARC social media channels.
 
17th November 2021  Presentations 1-2pm, Questions until 2.30pm  APEx Seminar  Parents and carers’ views and experiences of eczema in the online world: a mixed-methods exploration (PhD)
Dr Bethan Treadgold
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Primary Care Research Group
&
Blood pressure in older people and evidence for a post-hypertension syndrome
Dr Jane Masoli
NIHR clinical doctoral fellow and Specialist Registrar in Geriatric Medicine

For more details and to receive your e-ticket via Eventbrite, visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/apex-seminar-dr-bethan-treadgold-dr-jane-masoli-tickets-195079045677 
 
9th November 2021  1-4pm Health Statistics Group –
Stats Advice Clinics
For UEMS staff and UEMS research students 
Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries. Please email to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.
All clinics will be held by video call or telephone.

Professor Gordon Taylor
Email: h.v.wavish@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice 
 
27th May 2021 11.30am-12.30pm PenARC Seminar

Learning from null and negative effect trials in prevention science
Vashti Berry, Nick Axford and Katrina Wyatt

There can be a tendency for investigators to disregard or explain away null or negative results in prevention science trials. This is unhelpful for several reasons, not least that it skews the evidence base, undermines respect for science, and stifles creativity in intervention development. In our recent paper, we identify possible policy and practice responses when interventions have null (ineffective) or negative (harmful) results, and argue that these are influenced by: the intervention itself; trial design, conduct, and results; context; and individual perspectives and interests. We advance several strategies to promote more informative null or negative effect trials and enable learning from such results.

This short seminar will overview those strategies, and provide two case examples to illustrate how null results can enable learning and change to the intervention, process, culture and wider context/environment. There will also be an opportunity for networking and connecting with others undertaking intervention trials and/or providing or developing interventions being evaluated.

The seminar will take place from 11:30-12:00 and will be followed by networking 12:00-12:30.

Book here

Please note that this talk will be recorded and the recording may be shared publicly via the PenARC website.

 
30th March 2021 2-4pm Qualitative Research Forum: an informal group for staff and students doing qualitative research

Please note that these events are only open to members of staff and students at the University of Exeter.

The Qualitative Research Forum, based in the Institute for Health Research, for staff and students doing qualitative research in some capacity, was launched in September 2020, organised by Julia Frost, Jo Day, Cornelia Guell, Sarah Bell and Sarah Morgan-Trimmer. It will meet once every two months, alternately hosted by Exeter and Truro.

Qualitative Research in Times of Covid-19
Sarah and Conny will start the session with a 'fireside' chat with Professor Katharine Tyler, Associate Professor in Anthropology, to hear about her experiences of conducting fieldwork in the past year under Covid-19 restrictions. Katharine and her team are researching people’s experiences of inequalities in the face of Covid-19 and Brexit. The project is entitled ‘Identity, inequality and the media in Brexit-covid-19-Britain, https://www.brexit-studies.org/covid-19/. We'll talk about changing research designs, methods and related ethical implications.

We’ll then break out into smaller groups to discuss challenges and opportunities we might each have experienced and navigated, in particular around methods, engagement and ethical challenges arising when conducting research in a time of crisis and using new or unfamiliar approaches to data collection.

To book, please visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qualitative-research-forum-tickets-144389150837?aff=ebdssbeac

 
24th March 2021 1-2pm APEx Seminar

Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer diagnosis in primary care
Dr Sam Merriel
Clinical Senior Research Fellow at The University of Exeter
Presentation then Q&A 1-1.30pm

And

The impact of reducing referral thresholds for urgent cancer investigation in England
Dr Sarah Moore
Academic Clinical Fellow at The University of Exeter
Presentation and Q&A 1.30-2pm

Though this isn’t our usual seminar format, we’ll still leave the call open until 2.30 for a relaxed opportunity to join in the discussions.

Please register via Eventbrite to receive your ticket: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/apex-seminars-dr-sam-merriel-and-dr-sarah-moore-cancer-focus-tickets-141985242683

 
16th March 2021 1-4pm Health Statistics Group - Stats Advice Clinics 

For UEMS staff and UEMS research students

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment. All clinics will be held by video call or telephone.

Dr Fiona Warren
Email: F.C.Warren@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

 
8th March 2021   Qualitative Research Advice Clinics

These advice clinics have been set up to help to respond to qualitative research study related queries from within PenARC and the Institute for Health Research. Whether you are a postgraduate student, an academic or a researcher who has a query about any phase of a qualitative project from design to writing up, you can book an appointment to speak with someone from the College of Medicine and Health with general expertise in qualitative research who can advise and signpost. The clinics consist of 30-minute appointments with up to two advisors.

Please book via Eventbrite

 
17th February 2021 Seminar 1-2pm

Questions 2-2.30pm
APEx Seminar

Inter-arm blood pressure difference: what have we learnt over 25 years?

Dr Chris Clark
Clinical Senior Lecturer in General Practice at The University of Exeter

The implications of a difference in blood pressure readings between arms has intrigued Chris from his earliest days of primary care training. In this seminar he aims to give some insight into his research journey - from origins based on a simple clinical observation through to his current international studies.

Please register via Eventbrite to receive your ticket: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/apex-seminar-dr-chris-clark-inter-arm-blood-pressure-difference-tickets-137394569857
 
 
9th February 2021 12-2pm Health Statistics Group  - Stats Advice Clinics

For UEMS staff and UEMS research students

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment. All clinics will be held by video call or telephone.

Dr Lauren Rodgers
Email: L.R.Rodgers@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

 
29th January 2021   Qualitative Research Advice Clinics

These advice clinics have been set up to help to respond to qualitative research study related queries from within PenARC and the Institute for Health Research. Whether you are a postgraduate student, an academic or a researcher who has a query about any phase of a qualitative project from design to writing up, you can book an appointment to speak with someone from the College of Medicine and Health with general expertise in qualitative research who can advise and signpost. The clinics consist of 30-minute appointments with up to two advisors.

Please book via Eventbrite
 
26th January 2021 1-3pm Qualitative Research Forum Qualitative Research Forum: an informal group for staff and students doing qualitative research

The Qualitative Research Forum, based in the Institute for Health Research, for staff and students doing qualitative research in some capacity, was launched in September 2020, organised by Julia Frost, Jo Day, Cornelia Guell, Sarah Bell and Sarah Morgan-Trimmer. It will meet once every two months, alternately hosted by Exeter and Truro.

Please note that these events are only open to members of staff and students at the University of Exeter.

Visual Data Collection and Dissemination for Qualitative Research
In the first half of this session, we will watch part of an online interview with Curie Scott about her phenomenographic approach in ageing research, followed by a discussion in breakout rooms.

Sometimes available methods and methodologies are not adequate, and we need to adapt approaches to fit the study. Dr Curie Scott found herself in this situation, so she re-interpreted a phenomenographic methodology for her study about perceptions towards self-ageing. Curie incorporated the use of participant drawing: “having looked at the field of drawing, I was intrigued by investigating drawing as ‘intelligent practice’, a way for adults to think through issues that were hard to articulate in words alone".

In the second half of the session we will be hearing from Dr Siobhan O’Dwyer (Senior Lecturer in Ageing and Family Care at the University of Exeter College of Medicine and Health). Her research focuses on crisis experiences in family carers, including suicide, homicide, and self-harm. This research is complex and potentially controversial, but traditional academic outputs often lack the sensitivity required to foster meaningful conversations and facilitate social or political change. In this meeting of the Qualitative Research Forum, Siobhan will talk about her adventures in the wonderful world of arts-based impact. She will share her own (and others') experiences of working with artists, poets, and playwrights, highlighting the opportunities and potential pitfalls.

Please click on this link to register

 
20th January 2021 2-4pm Health Statistics Group –
Stats Advice Clinics

For UEMS staff and UEMS research students

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment. All clinics will be held by video call or telephone.

Professor Gary Abel
Email: G.A.Abel@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

 

Past Events 2020

Date  TimeTitleDescriptionLocation
24th November 2020 11am - 1pm Qualitative Research Forum: an informal group for staff and students doing qualitative research

The Qualitative Research Forum, based in the Institute for Health Research, for staff and students doing qualitative research in some capacity, was launched in September 2020, organised by Julia Frost, Jo Day, Cornelia Guell, Sarah Bell and Sarah Morgan-Trimmer. It will meet once every two months, alternately hosted by Exeter and Truro.

The second meeting will be from 11:00 - 13:00 hours on Tuesday, 24th November, when Professor Judith Green will talk on Collaboration in Analysing Qualitative Data, and we hope that anyone interested in qualitative methodologies will participate and help to shape the future direction of the group.

Please note that these events are only open to members of staff and students at the University of Exeter.

To register, please visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qualitative-research-forum-tickets-123165598621
Online event
18th November 2020 1-2pm (taking questions until 14:30) APEx seminar Reflections on 40 years in Research: From mice to NICE and beyond
Prof David Halpin
Consultant Physician & Honorary Professor of Respiratory Medicine at The University of Exeter

Prof Halpin will discuss the different research programmes he has been involved with over the last 40 years and reflect on how they originated and evolved.  He will discuss how they have affected his clinical practice and facilitated the development of clinical guidelines.  He will also discuss current and forthcoming projects.


Please sign up on Eventbrite and share the link with anyone you think might also be interested: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/exeter-academic-primary-care-seminar-prof-david-halpin-tickets-116588141269

If you have any questions, please email Chloe Thomas: c.thomas6@exeter.ac.uk

via MS Teams
9th September 2020 12.30-1.30pm Clinical Education Seminar Addressing the academic support needs of international students in a modern medical education curriculum
Dr Tudor Chinnah, Senior Lecturer, University of Exeter Medical School
 
18th August 2020 12-3pm Stats Advice Clinics Stats Advice Clinics
For UEMS staff and UEMS research students

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries. Please email to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

All clinics will be held by video call or telephone.

Dr Fiona Warren - Email: F.C.Warren@exeter.ac.uk
 
TBC July 2020 12.30-1.30pm  Clinical Education Seminar  Well-Being: a forum to share outcomes of the Soft Skills 4th UEMS pilots and reflect on opportunities for faculty engagement in future
Dr Daisy Robinson, Professional Development Group Tutor, University of Exeter Medical School
 
 
14th July 2020    Searching and Review clinic 

These clinics have been set up to help the PenARC Evidence Synthesis Team to manage and respond to systematic review related queries from within the geographical area covered by PenARC.  Whether you are an academic or an NHS professional who needs to know where to start on the systematic review process or how to go about designing a search strategy, you can book an appointment with one of our reviewers or information specialists.

Please visit: https://www.arc-swp.nihr.ac.uk/searching-and-review-clinics
 
8th July 2020 1-2.30pm APEx Seminar

The SPOtting Cancer among Comorbidities (SPOCC) programme.
Dr Gary Abel
Senior Lecturer & Statistician
Primary Care, UEMS

Supporting clinical decision making in patients with symptoms of cancer and pre-existing conditions.

Join the online seminar. For the calendar invite /if you have any queries, please email c.thomas6@exeter.ac.uk

 
6th July 2020   Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic
For PenARC and IHR Staff and Students

CMH qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research study queries.

Please book a time via Eventbrite.

Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 4 working days prior to the event

2.35, South Cloisters, St Luke's
18th June 2020   Searching and Review clinic

These clinics have been set up to help the PenARC Evidence Synthesis Team to manage and respond to systematic review related queries from within the geographical area covered by PenARC.  Whether you are an academic or an NHS professional who needs to know where to start on the systematic review process or how to go about designing a search strategy, you can book an appointment with one of our reviewers or information specialists.

Please visit: https://www.arc-swp.nihr.ac.uk/searching-and-review-clinics

 
17th June 2020 12.30-1.30pm Clinical Education Seminar

Title TBC
Professor Sandra Nicholson, Centre Lead, Centre for Medical Education, Queen Mary University of London

112, Baring Court, St Luke's
10th June 2020   Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic
For PenARC and IHR Staff and Students

CMH qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research study queries.

Please book a time via Eventbrite.

Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 4 working days prior to the event.

2.17, South Cloisters, St Luke's
27th May 2020 12.30-1.30pm Clinical Education Seminar

Progress Testing in Medical Education
Mr Neil Rice, Senior Assessment Psychometrician, University of Exeter Medical School

218, Baring Court, St Luke's
19th May 2020   Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic
For PenARC and IHR Staff and Students

CMH qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research study queries.

Please book a time via Eventbrite.

Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 4 working days prior to the event.

1.13, College House, St Luke's
30th April 2020 12.30-2.00pm Clinical Education Seminar

Curriculum Design using Gold Standard Project Based Learning (GSPBL) to develop 21st century skills
Dr Corrina Cory, Senior Lecturer in Engineering and Entrepreneurship, Strategic Curriculum Development Lead

218, Baring Court, St Luke's
19th March 2020 1.30-2.30pm ESMI Guest Lecture Series

****POSTPONED****

Cochrane – the challenges and opportunities
Martin Burton, Director Cochrane UK

For over 25 years Cochrane has produced high-quality systematic reviews and played a key role in the world of evidence-based medicine.  It has fiercely guarded its independence and sought to promote a wider and better understanding of the healthcare research.  What challenges and opportunities lie ahead, in an era full of ‘fake news”?  And one in which there is an increasing belief that the world’s great problems – in health care and beyond - will never be solved by academia alone.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
18th March 2020 12.30-1.30pm Clinical Education Seminar

****POSTPONED****

Assessment - Have you ever wondered if we could be doing it better
Helen Reid
GP and Clinical Lecturer in the Centre for Medical Education (CME), Queen’s University Belfast (QUB)

Helen Reid’s PhD in Medical Education (2018) explored ‘undervoiced’ stakeholder perspectives around OSCEs.  Her research interests encompass assessment, women’s health, professional development and interdisciplinarity. Her seminar will focus on those who are involved with any aspect of assessment in Health Professions Education and whether it we could be done better.  OSCEs are ubiquitous in health professions education (HPE).  Impending introduction of a medical licensing assessment (the GMC’s ‘MLA’) in the UK context has potential to increase OSCEs’ position. Such dominance - hegemony - can bring unintended consequences, warranting critical consideration.  There is a real risk that the importance of patient care is diminished in a quest for accountable, standardised assessments.  This interactive session will share insights from contemporary assessment research aiming to develop participants’ own thinking around OSCEs and broader assessment practices.

The aim of this session is to contribute, critically and constructively, to conversations around assessment in HPE.  This will be done through:

  • Identifying potential tensions in performance assessments in different settings, with specific focus on patient involvement
  • Sharing insights from contemporary OSCE and broader assessment research
  • Considering some practical strategies to enhance assessment in our own settings with patient care remaining a central goal.
Programme:
Tea/coffee  12:15-12:30 Outside Baring Court 217
Lecture       12:30-13:15  Baring Court 217
Q&A           13:15-13:30  Baring Court 217

To register please email: CMHFacultyDevelopment@exeter.ac.uk
217, Baring Court, St Luke's
5th March 2020  11am-12pm Seminar Developing a framework for assessing the impact of test measurement uncertainty on clinical and health-economic outcomes
Alison Smith
Research Fellow, University of Leeds

A multitude of factors can introduce errors into clinical test measurements, relating to how test samples are collected, stored and analysed. If, as a result, test values are incorrectly observed as lying outside key test decision thresholds then this uncertainty can affect the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of testing strategies. Currently, however, test measurement uncertainty is poorly understood within the test evaluation community and rarely considered within health technology assessments (HTAs).

In this talk, Alison will present novel methods for assessing the impact of test measurement uncertainty on HTA outcomes, based on findings from a recent methodology review. An application of these methods will be illustrated using a case study of faecal calprotectin for the diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in the UK primary care setting.


Please register your attendance at https://bit.ly/2FA329r

JS07, Smeal Building, St Luke's
26th February 2020   Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

For PenARC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Further dates will be advertised in due course.

Please book a time via Eventbrite.

Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 4 working days prior to the event.

2.35, South Cloisters, St Luke's
26th February 2020 12-1pm Seminar

Graphical and online frameworks for multiple testing
Dr David Robertson
MRC Biostatistics Unit, University of Cambridge

In the classical framework of drug development, the response to experimental therapies is evaluated one treatment at a time within a homogenous patient group. However, this paradigm is increasingly shifting towards testing multiple hypotheses (corresponding to multiple treatments, subgroups and endpoints), with an additional emphasis on adaptive trial designs. At the same time there continues to be a strong focus, particularly from a regulatory perspective, on guaranteeing control of suitable error rates. In this talk, I discuss recent methodological advances for multiple testing in two general trial settings.

Firstly, I consider trials where the hypotheses have a hierarchical structure that reflects different clinical objectives. The graphical approach of Bretz et al. (2009) is a flexible and easily communicable way of testing multiple structured hypotheses while controlling the familywise error rate (FWER). However, the FWER is a stringent criterion that leads to procedures with a low power, and may not be appropriate in exploratory trial settings. This motivates controlling generalised error rates that are more relaxed. I show how to control these generalised error rates when using the graphical approach, and demonstrate the utility of the resulting graphical procedures on three clinical trial case studies.

Secondly, I compare and contrast recently proposed procedures for error rate control in trials with ‘online’ hypothesis testing. In this setting, a sequence of hypotheses is tested and the investigator has to decide whether to reject the current null hypothesis without having access to the future p-values, or even the number of hypotheses to be tested. A key example is the perpetual platform trial design, which allows multiple treatment arms to be added throughout the course of the trial. Using simulation scenarios and case studies, I provide recommendations for which procedures to use in practice for online multiple testing.

Please register your attendance at https://bit.ly/2UnuFeA

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
18th February 2020 12-3pm Health Statistics Group - Stats Advice Clinic

For UEMS staff and UEMS research students
Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following
sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment. Telephone  appointment can be held for those based in Cornwall.

Dr Fiona Warren
Email: F.C.Warren@exeter.ac.uk

Smeall Building, St Luke's
18th February 2020 10.30am-12pm Introductory-level process evaluation workshops

These 90-minute workshops will introduce the basic principles of good process evaluation design. The three workshops are designed to build on each other, but you can attend only one if you wish.

1. Introduction to Process Evaluation
This workshop will introduce the key terms, concepts and design principles of process evaluation. It will also cover how to identify relevant research questions, select appropriate methods, and balance competing demands within a process evaluation.
2. Developing Theory and Logic Models for Process Evaluations    
The workshop will: outline the relevance of using a theory-based approach; discuss the practical application of different types of theory for process evaluation; demonstrate how logic models can be developed to underpin a good process evaluation; and discuss the benefits and challenges of using this approach.
3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations
This workshop will: introduce the rationale for using data integration techniques; summarise different techniques for integrating qualitative and quantitative data and datasets; discuss the application of data integration for different types of trial and research question; and discuss how to deal with conflicting data.

For more information about process evaluation see: http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/ihrprocessevaluation/

Times and dates
The workshops will be held at 10:30-12:00 on the following dates:
1. Introduction to Process Evaluation - Tuesday 4 February
2. Using Theory and Logic Models in Process Evaluations - Tuesday 11 February
3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations - Tuesday 18 February

Suitable for
Researchers and PhD students conducting process evaluations as part of randomised controlled trials. The workshops will assume basic familiarity with qualitative and quantitative research methods, and randomised controlled trials.

Registration
Please contact s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk to register for one or more of the workshops, or if you have any questions or want to discuss any accessibility requirements.

Please bring a notebook/paper and a pen to the workshop(s).

2.17, South Cloisters, St Luke's
11th February 2020 10.30am-12pm Introductory-level process evaluation workshops

These 90-minute workshops will introduce the basic principles of good process evaluation design. The three workshops are designed to build on each other, but you can attend only one if you wish.

1. Introduction to Process Evaluation
This workshop will introduce the key terms, concepts and design principles of process evaluation. It will also cover how to identify relevant research questions, select appropriate methods, and balance competing demands within a process evaluation.
2. Developing Theory and Logic Models for Process Evaluations    
The workshop will: outline the relevance of using a theory-based approach; discuss the practical application of different types of theory for process evaluation; demonstrate how logic models can be developed to underpin a good process evaluation; and discuss the benefits and challenges of using this approach.
3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations
This workshop will: introduce the rationale for using data integration techniques; summarise different techniques for integrating qualitative and quantitative data and datasets; discuss the application of data integration for different types of trial and research question; and discuss how to deal with conflicting data.

For more information about process evaluation see: http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/ihrprocessevaluation/

Times and dates
The workshops will be held at 10:30-12:00 on the following dates:
1. Introduction to Process Evaluation - Tuesday 4 February
2. Using Theory and Logic Models in Process Evaluations - Tuesday 11 February
3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations - Tuesday 18 February

Suitable for
Researchers and PhD students conducting process evaluations as part of randomised controlled trials. The workshops will assume basic familiarity with qualitative and quantitative research methods, and randomised controlled trials.

Registration
Please contact s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk to register for one or more of the workshops, or if you have any questions or want to discuss any accessibility requirements.

Please bring a notebook/paper and a pen to the workshop(s).

2.17, South Cloisters, St Luke's
7th February 2020 12-30-1.30pm Clinical Education Seminar

RUPTURES IN PRACTICE: coping and learning in the here-and-now of clinical practice
by Arunthathi Mahendran
Senior Lecturer and Consultant Transplant Surgeon, Queen Mary University/Barts and the Royal London Medical School

Event Information
Arunthathi (Arundi) Mahendran is a senior lecturer and consultant transplant surgeon as well as programme director for the MSc. in Physician Associate Studies at Queen Mary University/Barts and the Royal London Medical School. She undertook her specialist surgical training at the Royal Free hospital in London and subsequently completed a transplant surgical fellowship at Columbia University in Manhattan, New York.  She has a PhD in Education from Goldsmiths’, University of London and was the 2018 Winner of the (BERA) British Educational Research Association Doctoral Thesis Award.  Her research interest lies in the philosophy of practices of thinking, knowing and doing across medical and clinical education.  Arundi lives in the East End of London with her husband and two young sons.  

Her present research focuses on the emotional complexities of learning and practice by exploring how the uncertainty of clinical practice can trigger powerful affective experiences that transform the ways in which a professional comes to understand their practice and function within it.   

Programme:
Tea/coffee    12:15-12:30 Atrium outside South Cloisters 3.06
Lecture         12:30-13:15  South Cloisters 3.06
Q&A              13:15-13:30  South Cloisters 3.06

To register please email: CMHFacultyDevelopment@exeter.ac.uk

South Cloisters 3.06, St Luke’s
6th February 2020 1.30-2.30pm Seminar

Integrating health economics into the development and evaluation pipeline for medical tests
Dr. Bethany Shinkins
Lead of the Test Evaluation Group (TEG) at the University of Leeds

Modern medicine is increasingly reliant on medical tests; screening programs, diagnosis of disease, monitoring individuals with chronic disease, and prediction of treatment response and longer-term health all depend on tests. To recommend the use of a test, guideline developers (such as NICE or CADTH) require high quality evidence that the test improves patient health and that it is cost-effective. There are a number of features unique to medical tests that make timely evidence generation in this area challenging.

This presentation will explore some of these complexities and provide an overview of our methodological development work in this space, including early economic modelling, target product profiles, outcome-based analytical performance specifications, adaptive trial designs and incorporating real world evidence into cost-effectiveness evaluations.

Please register your attendance at https://bit.ly/2FA329r

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
5th February 2020 1-2pm APEx Seminar Series

***POSTPONED***

20 years of inter-arm difference: what have we learned?
Dr Chris Clark, Clinical Senior Lecturer in General Practice

There will be a sandwich lunch from 12.30 in the downstairs lobby of Smeall, so it would help if you can let me know if you are attending.

See more on our website.

All are welcome!

Please reply to apexseminars@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke’s
4th February 2020 10.30am-12pm Introductory-level process evaluation workshops

These 90-minute workshops will introduce the basic principles of good process evaluation design. The three workshops are designed to build on each other, but you can attend only one if you wish.

1. Introduction to Process Evaluation
This workshop will introduce the key terms, concepts and design principles of process evaluation. It will also cover how to identify relevant research questions, select appropriate methods, and balance competing demands within a process evaluation.
2. Developing Theory and Logic Models for Process Evaluations    
The workshop will: outline the relevance of using a theory-based approach; discuss the practical application of different types of theory for process evaluation; demonstrate how logic models can be developed to underpin a good process evaluation; and discuss the benefits and challenges of using this approach.
3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations
This workshop will: introduce the rationale for using data integration techniques; summarise different techniques for integrating qualitative and quantitative data and datasets; discuss the application of data integration for different types of trial and research question; and discuss how to deal with conflicting data.

For more information about process evaluation see: http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/ihrprocessevaluation/

Times and dates
The workshops will be held at 10:30-12:00 on the following dates:
1. Introduction to Process Evaluation - Tuesday 4 February
2. Using Theory and Logic Models in Process Evaluations - Tuesday 11 February
3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations - Tuesday 18 February

Suitable for
Researchers and PhD students conducting process evaluations as part of randomised controlled trials. The workshops will assume basic familiarity with qualitative and quantitative research methods, and randomised controlled trials.

Registration
Please contact s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk to register for one or more of the workshops, or if you have any questions or want to discuss any accessibility requirements.

Please bring a notebook/paper and a pen to the workshop(s).

2.17, South Cloisters, St Luke's
22nd January 2020 12.30-13.30   Seminar Financial problems and health inequalities in Europe: how does Italy compare?
Dr. Margherita Giannoni
Associate Professor Public and Health Economics at the University of Perugia, Italy

The presentation looks at the role that people’s financial difficulties have on the determinants of self-reported health in Italy as compared with selected other European countries. The presentation will begin with an overview of the evolution of the Italian healthcare system and equity in health and access to healthcare in that country. Next, evidence from quantitative analysis conducted with colleagues will illustrate how being over indebted can influence people’s physical health. This includes a conceptual model that uses home ownership as a base to analyze the socioeconomic determinants of health, to test whether over-indebtedness and home ownership can be considered autonomous determinants of European individuals’ health.

The research shows that being in a household that is in arrears with payments and at risk of becoming deeply in debt is a consistent and robust predictor of poor health outcomes, whereas home ownership positively affects individual self-reported health.

Please register your attendance at https://bit.ly/2FA329r
217, Baring Court, St Luke’s 
15th January 2020  1-2pm APEx Seminar Series  A Primary Care Response to Frailty: Mind the (Evidence) Gap
Prof. Suzanne Richards, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences

This seminar will discuss some the important differences found in approaches to defining and measuring frailty:

Is frailty reversible?
What are the evidence-based interventions for frailty?
Is the ‘F’ word acceptable to patients and their families?

There will be a sandwich lunch from 12.30 in the downstairs lobby of Smeall, so it would help if you can let me know you are attending.

See more on our website.

All are welcome!
 
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke’s 

Past Events 2019

Date  TimeTitleDescriptionLocation
11th December 2019 1-2pm APEx Journal Club

Three short presentations for discussion
Please look at these papers in advance if you can. They will then be discussed in turn. All contributions welcome.

1.“Is red meat bad for you?: Systematic review (Chris Clark)
ZeraatkarD et al. Red and processed meat consumption and risk for all-cause mortality and cardiometabolicoutcomes. Annals of Internal Medicine 2019. doi:10.7326/M19-0655
2. “GPs, money, and quality of care –mercenary or what?” (John Campbell)
Minchin M et al. Quality of care in the United Kingdom after removal of financial incentives. New England Journal of Medicine 2018; doi:10.1056/NEJMsa1801495
3. “Does knowing the timing of abuse help action to be taken” (Emma Pitchforth)
BohrenMA et al. How women are treated during facility-based childbirth in four countries: a cross-sectional study with labour observations and community-based surveys. Lancet 2019. doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(19)31992-0

12.30 in the downstairs lobby of Smeall for a sandwich lunch and informal networking

Please email: apexseminars@exeter.ac.uk to book your place.
For further information visit: www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/apex/seminars

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's 
11th December 2019 1-2pm

Health Economics Group

Seminar

***CANCELLED***

Integrating health economics into the development and evaluation pipeline for medical tests

Dr. Bethany Shinkins
Lead of the Test Evaluation Group (TEG) at the University of Leeds

Modern medicine is increasingly reliant on medical tests; screening programs, diagnosis of disease, monitoring individuals with chronic disease, and prediction of treatment response and longer-term health all depend on tests. To recommend the use of a test, guideline developers (such as NICE or CADTH) require high quality evidence that the test improves patient health and that it is cost-effective. There are a number of features unique to medical tests that make timely evidence generation in this area challenging.

This presentation will explore some of these complexities and provide an overview of our methodological development work in this space, including early economic modelling, target product profiles, outcome-based analytical performance specifications, adaptive trial designs and incorporating real world evidence into cost-effectiveness evaluations.

Please register your attendance at https://bit.ly/2PoYGYG

For further information please contact l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
27th November 2019 1-2pm APEx Seminar

Dr Jo Butterworth and Grace Dibben will be presenting their own work.  There will be a sandwich lunch from 12.30 in the downstairs lobby of Smeall immediately prior to the seminar, so it would help if you can let me know you are attending. See details below and more on our website.
 
Dr Jo Butterworth, NIHR Doctoral Research Fellow, UEMS
Interventions for involving older patients with multimorbidity in decision-making during primary care consultations: A Cochrane systematic review
And
Grace Dibben, PhD Student, UEMS
Cardiac rehabilitation and physical activity levels in heart failure

Please contact Joy Choules apexseminars@exeter.ac.uk
01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
21st November 2019 12pm IHR ECRN meeting

The next meeting of the IHR Early Career Researcher Network will be on Thursday 21st November.

Claire Hulme, the new director of the IHR, will be taking this opportunity to come along and meet us and talk with us about her plans to support the ECRN going forwards.

For further information, please contact Liz Shaw (E.H.Shaw@exeter.ac.uk)

S11, Medical School Building, St Luke's
20th November 2019 1-4pm Health Statistics Group - Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment. Telephone appointment can be held for those based in Cornwall.

Associate Professor Obi Ukoumunne
Email: O.C.Ukoumunne@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's campus
19th November 2019   Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic
For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Further dates will be advertised in due course.Please booka time via Eventbrite

Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 4 working days prior to the event.

2.35, South Cloisters, St Luke's
6th November 2019 1.30-4pm Academic staff event

An important event for academic staff involved in PGR supervision, assessing upgrades and examining.

One important issue for us in the College of Medicine and Health is for supervisors and upgrade assessors to discuss modifications to assessing upgrades given the process will happen before 12 months, and how to ensure fair and consistent approach. Session will be partly led by Caitlin Kight with some scenarios for us to discuss, also update from PGR Admin on changes to student monitoring in MyPGR.

Please register by emailing N.J.Church@exeter.ac.uk

Smeall Building, St Luke's

VC to Truro on request

16th October 2019 1-2pm APEx Seminar

Challenges for economic evaluation when doing research with people with learning disabilities: The OK Diabetes Study

Professor Claire Hulme
Professor of Health Economics, University of Exeter Medical School

There are around 1.2 million people in the UK with a mild or moderate learning disability. People with a learning disability have poorer health, experience delays in diagnosis and treatment, are more likely to have multiple health problems, poorer health outcomes and shorter life expectancy. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are common in this population.

This presentation reports on challenges during development and testing of data collection methods for use in an economic evaluation within a RCT for a manualised supported diabetes self-management programme for people with mild/moderate learning disabilities: The OK Diabetes Study.

Join us from 12.30 for a sandwich lunch and informal networking

Email: j.l.Choules@exeter.ac.uk to book your place
For further information visit: www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/apex/seminars

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
15th October 2019 10am-1pm Health Statistics Group - Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment. Telephone appointment can be held for those based in Cornwall.

Professor William Henley
Email: L.K.Watson@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's campus
9th October 2019 1-2pm Creative Communications Seminar

Using Wikipedia to disseminate your research - Workshop

This workshop is open to all researchers and research-facing professional service staff and is recommended for those interested in using creative methods to engage people with research and disseminate their findings beyond traditional academic journals.

Workshop participants will be provided with the opportunity and support to develop their skills in writing Wikipedia pages which they can use to disseminate their own research.

Richard Nevell is an archaeologist who previously worked for English Heritage and now works for Wikimedia UK, the UK-based charity supporting the Wikimedia projects. He has been writing for Wikipedia as a volunteer since 2006 and training people to contribute since 2012.

Please email Dr Liz Shaw (E.H.Shaw@exeter.ac.uk) to register to attend.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's campus 
25th September 2019   Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic
For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Further dates will be advertised in due course.Please booka time via Eventbrite

Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 4 working days prior to the event.

2.17, South Cloisters, St Luke's
18th September 2019 1-2pm APEx seminar

Physical activity and serious mental health conditions: evidence, mechanisms and implementation
Dr Brendon Stubbs, Head of Physiotherapy, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (IoPPN) & NIHR Clinical Lecturer, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London

Dr Stubbs will be talking about the potential for physical activity to prevent and manage mental illness (see flyer and website for further details). There will be refreshments from 12.30 in the downstairs lobby of Smeall immediately prior to the seminar. If you don’t have a swipe card, the entry code that day will be 8423.

Contact Joy Choules apexseminars@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's 
10th September 2019 10am-1pm Health Statistics Group - Stats Advice Clinics

For UEMS staff and UEMS research students

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment. Telephone appointment can be held for those based in Cornwall.

Dr John Dennis - Email: L.R.Rodgers@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's campus

20th August 2019 12.30-1.30 Workshop

Using social media as a medical professional: tips, tricks, benefits and pitfalls
Catherine Hennessy, Lecturer of Anatomy
Brighton and Sussex Medical School

Catherine Hennessy, B.Sc. (Hons), M.Sc., PG.C.A.P, F.H.E.A., is a Lecturer of Anatomy at Brighton and Sussex Medical School in Brighton, UK. She teaches anatomy to undergraduate and postgraduate entry medical and allied health science students. She is conducting a part-time PhD exploring how medical students and doctors develop their understanding of social media professionalism and the development of a professional online identity. Her other research interests include developing anatomy core curricula for health professionals.

Teas/coffees     12:15-12:30 Atrium outside SC 3.06
Workshop         12:30-13:30       

To register please contact c.pierce@exeter.ac.uk or 01392 406808

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's

VC to KSpa F10

22nd July 2019    Qualitative Research Advice Clinic 

These advice clinics have been set up to help to respond to qualitative research related queries from within PenCLAHRC and the Institute for Health Research. Whether you are a postgraduate student, an academic or a researcher who has a query about any phase of a qualitative project from design to writing up, you can book an appointment to speak with someone from the University of Exeter Medical School with general expertise in qualitative research who can advise and signpost. The clinics consist of 30-minute appointments with up to two advisors. To ensure that you gain the most from the clinic, please focus on clearly explaining one or two queries on which you would like to receive advice. We will send more guidance prior to your appointment on how to best use the time.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: https://store.exeter.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/nihr-clahrc-south-west-peninsula/qualitative-research-advice-clinic/22072019-qualitative-research-advice-clinic
 
 
18th July 2019 10am-1pm Health Statistics Group - Stats Advice Clinics

For UEMS staff and UEMS research students

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment. Telephone appointment can be held for those based in Cornwall.

Associate Professor Obi Ukoumunne - Email: O.C.Ukoumunne@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's 
15th July 2019 1-4.30pm Creative Communication Seminar

Getting your research known: Using Altmetrics to record interest in your research

Andrew Tattersall, an Information Specialist from the University of Sheffield will be discussing how to share your work with others in a way which is traceable and detectable through the use of Altmetrics. For full details of this event, please see the attached.

This professional development activity is a Researcher-Led Initiative that is funded by the University of Exeter Researcher Development & Research Culture Team.

Please contact Liz Shaw (E.H.Shaw@exeter.ac.uk) to reserve your place and find out more about VC links to Plymouth and Truro.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's

VC to Plymouth and Truro

4th July 2019 2-4pm Workshop

Strengthening the quality of qualitative papers for REF 2021

All those doing qualitative research are invited to attend this workshop. If you have attended a previous workshop, you are welcome to do so again.

We ask you to bring with you a piece of qualitative research you are working on and that you are proposing to publish. If you have a paper already drafted but not yet submitted, that is perfect. Alternatively, bring a paper that you have already published, or come with a project in mind that you are intending to write up for publication.

In small groups we will work on writing and/or rewriting our abstracts so as to emphasise the originality, significance and rigour of our research (REF criteria), and discuss them with others.

Please contact Linda Dumchen linda.dumchen@exeter.ac.uk by Tuesday, 25th June 2019 if you would like to attend this workshop, so that we can send you a brief document which explains what these three criteria mean, with examples from published qualitative research.

Baring Court Room 08, St Luke's
28th June 2019 12-45-3.30pm Early Career Researcher event

Open to all IHR early career researchers and research facing professional services staff, Tristan has organised several excellent speakers and a buffet lunch. Our plan for the afternoon is as follows:

12:45-13:30 -  Buffet lunch
13:30-13:40 -  Welcome
13:40-14:00 – Research Finance and Support (Pam Gurney and Roz Harrison-Browne)
14:00-14:20 – International research and opportunities (Iain Lang)
14:20-14:40 -  Personal background, research interests, plans within his new role as head of PenTAG (GJ Melendez-Torres)
14:40-15:00 – The view from HR on promotion, fixed term contracts and other matters (Katharine Harris and Jane Slaven
15:00-15:30 -  Reflections and future of the ECRN

This professional development activity is a Researcher-Led Initiative that is funded by the University of Exeter Researcher Development & Research Culture Team.

Please let Liz Shaw (E.H.Shaw@exeter.ac.uk) know if you will be attending.

1.24, South Cloisters, St Luke's
26th June 2019 3-4pm NIHR Pitch & Putt Hustings Event

The next NIHR Pitch and Putt Hustings has been arranged for Weds 26th June. This is a good opportunity to pitch your early grant ideas for applications to this funder.
 
Please remember everyone is invited whether you are pitching or not.  Early Career Researchers are encouraged to both pitch and attend; for these colleagues we will ensure that at least one senior academic will be briefed beforehand to provide specific feedback to your presentation.
 
The aims of the event are to:

  1. Pitch early stage research ideas to develop proposals and connect with potential collaborators
  2. Pitch formed research proposals to receive funder specific feedback
  3. Provide the opportunity, as part of the audience, to gain knowledge of what is happening across the university
  4. Provide opportunity for networking across all career stages of the academic community.

If you are thinking of pitching, please remember it isn’t about the fine detail, but consider the points below.

  • What is the question/problem?
  • Why is it novel?
  • What is my approach to answering it?
  • Why am I in a really good position to answer/tackle it now OR what support/advice are you looking for in order to get yourself into that position?

Actions:
Please email S.E.Donovan@exeter.ac.uk if you:

  1. would like further information about a pitching slot, or
  2. plan to attend.
3.06 St Luke’s Campus, VC to DM Tutorial S, Penryn 
19th June 2019   Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

These advice clinics have been set up to help to respond to qualitative research related queries from within PenCLAHRC and the Institute for Health Research. Whether you are a postgraduate student, an academic or a researcher who has a query about any phase of a qualitative project from design to writing up, you can book an appointment to speak with someone from the University of Exeter Medical School with general expertise in qualitative research who can advise and signpost. The clinics consist of 30-minute appointments with up to two advisors. To ensure that you gain the most from the clinic, please focus on clearly explaining one or two queries on which you would like to receive advice. We will send more guidance prior to your appointment on how to best use the time.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: https://store.exeter.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/nihr-clahrc-south-west-peninsula/qualitative-research-advice-clinic/19062019-qualitative-research-advice-clinic

2.35, South Cloisters, St Luke's

17th June 2019

12.30-1.30

Creative Communications seminar Creative Communications Seminar: Stories of dementia-developing a strategic dissemination strategy using film and social media
Katie Featherstone, Reader, Medical Sociology Cardiff University

This seminar is open to all researchers and research-facing professional service staff and is recommended for those interested in using creative methods to engage people with research and disseminate their findings beyond traditional academic journals.

This seminar will use Stories of Dementia NIHR funded research programme as a case study to discuss the potential pathways to impact, with a focus on the use of film.  We will discuss the development of our programme and networks, the daily routines and longer-term strategies we used that have enhanced our ability to have rapid impacts on public discourse, practice, and policy. We will also discuss the key decisions, lessons learnt, and challenges along the way.  We describe the pathways to building our community and networks and our strategies to mobilize them in supporting the delivery of our research evidence using film and social media.

Please email Dr Liz Shaw (E.H.Shaw@exeter.ac.uk) to register to attend. If this event becomes over-subscribed, priority shall be given to Early Career Researchers.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's

VC to MR12, Plymouth and F10, Truro

24th May 2019

11.30am-2pm

GCRF College Workshop Since 2016 the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) has provided over £1.5 billion of research funding that addresses the challenges faced by developing countries.  The University is continuing to encourage applications for GCRF funding and is making preparations for the next round we expect to be announced later this year by holding a Global Challenges symposium at Streatham on Tuesday 4th and Wednesday 5th June 2019.

In advance of that in the College we have decided to hold an introductory workshop to GCRF.

The outline timetable for this workshop is currently as follows:

11.30  Welcome and introduction from Professor Angela Shore, ADR, CMH
11.40 Introduction to GCRF from  Sarah Tupper, GCRF Manager, Research Services
12.30 A view of GCRF from a current award holder  –  Professor Lora Fleming, Director of ECEHH
12.45 A further view of GCRF – Professor Rich Smith, Deputy PVC, CMH  
13.00 Lunch and networking and further discussion

We look forward to seeing a number of you at this although for those unable to attend we hope to make available a recording and the slides from some sections of the meeting.

Please confirm attendance to Nick Church (N.J.Church@exeter.ac.uk) and let him know of any dietary requirements.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's

Video-link to FO83, Knowledge Spa, Truro

22nd May 2019

2-3pm

Joint RSS South West Local Group and Exeter Health Statistics Event
Seminar
Publication bias, and a model for sensitivity analysis
John Copas
University of Warwick

Publication bias is a serious problem in the interpretation of reviews of the published literature. We will describe a relatively simple model for sensitivity analysis, based on empirical evidence that research studies giving significant results are more likely to be published. Some applications will be discussed.

If you would like to attend, please register at https://bit.ly/2EBVJx8

Please email Leala Watson if you require further information: l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk
3.06 South Cloisters, St Luke’s Campus
15th May 2019 

2-3pm

Refreshments will be available from 1:30pm

 
Joint APEX and Exeter Clinical Trials Unit Seminar  Dr Ben Darlow from the Department of primary Health Care and General Practice from the University of Otago, Wellingtpon, new Zealand will give a talk about lower back pain in general practice:

Effective and cost-effective primary care treatments for low back pain are required to reduce the burden of the world’s most disabling condition. Ben will talk about the results from the Low Back Pain in General Practice randomised trial and implementation study, completed in 2018, which compared the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Fear Reduction Exercised Early (FREE) approach to low back pain (intervention) with usual general practitioner care (control).

Ben completed his undergraduate physiotherapy degree at the University of Otago in 1998, and his Master of Sports Physiotherapy at Curtin University (Perth) in 2002. He completed his PhD at the University of Otago in 2014. His main research foci are the management of common musculoskeletal conditions in primary care and interprofessional education. Ben has explored clinician and patient attitudes and beliefs related to low back pain and osteoarthritis, resulting in several highly cited publications. He recently led the Low Back Pain in General Practice Study exploring the feasibility and impact of implementing a new approach to explaining and managing back pain in general practice. Ben has also led the development of the Back Pain Attitudes Questionnaire (Back-PAQ).

For further information please contact:  Jo Jacob j.jacob@exeter.ac.uk, Exeter CTU or Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke’s 
9th May 2019  1-2pm Seminar The impact of removing financial incentives.

Dr Rachel Meacock
Health Organisation, Policy and Economics, University of Manchester

Pay-for-performance schemes link financial payments by purchasers to the quality of care supplied by healthcare providers. The use of financial incentives as a mechanism for quality improvement is now commonplace across health systems globally. Whilst the impact of introducing financial incentives has been studied extensively, little is known about the consequences of removing financial incentives once they are in place. The overall benefits of pay-for-performance programmes will depend upon whether any resulting quality improvements represent permanent or transitory improvements.

We study incentive removal from the long-running UK Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), which links financial incentives to the quality of care provided by GPs in England. Doctors have claimed the scheme distorts clinical decision-making and induces them to provide care to patients that did not need it. Therefore, we expect to see care no longer provided to patients for whom indicators were unnecessary or inappropriate.

We consider the implications of our findings for clinical decision-making, equity and the long-term success of pay-for-performance schemes.

Please register your attendance at https://bit.ly/2E9cYcg

For further information please contact l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk

St Luke’s Campus, Exeter 
8th May 2019 1.30-3.30pm

Early career researchers and postgraduate researchers event

Beyond Exeter: Networks for Early Career and Postgraduate Researchers
Learn about networks that support, develop, connect and represent early career researchers

This is an event for early career researchers and postgraduate researchers – please circulate within your teams.

Please register at https://bit.ly/2uzJI6O. Please contact T.M.Snowsill@exeter.ac.uk if you have any questions.

Featuring presentations from Lucy Teece (Chair of the Young Statisticians Section of the Royal Statistical Society), Dr Rachel Meacock (Chair of the European Health Economics Association Early Career Committee) and Dr Max Barnish (Immediate Past Chair of the Society for Social Medicine and Population Health Early Career Researchers Subcommittee) and a panel discussion with questions invited from the audience.

This event is open to all staff and students, but is recommended for early career researchers and postgraduate researchers, particularly those in the Institute for Health Research or involved in running (or considering running) early career research networks.

This professional development activity is a Researcher-Led Initiative that is funded by the University of Exeter Researcher Development & Research Culture Team.

2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
7th May 2019 1-2pm

Health Statistics Group Seminar

Prognostic Models and Competing Risks

Lucy Teece
Research Associate (Biostatistics/Epidemiology),
Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester
 
Prognostic models are used in medical and health research to predict an individual’s future health outcomes, including risk of disease progression and the development of further complications. Communicating these risks enables clinicians to help a patient understand their own risks and to plan and manage a patient’s illness.
 
The statistical methods used to develop these models are often naïve to the presence of competing events, these are events which may prevent or alter the probability of the outcome of interest from occurring.
 
In this presentation, Lucy will introduce prognostic model research and the concept of competing risks, and explore the impact of competing risks on prognostic model research.
 
If you would like to attend, please register at
https://bit.ly/2EPrKSi 
 
Please email Leala Watson if you require further information: l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk
2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's
3rd May 2019 1-2pm

Joint ESMI/LKD Seminar

Making evidence credible for public health policy
Dr Kathryn Oliver
Associate Professor in Sociology and Public Health
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Debates about the role of evidence in policymaking have tended to focus primarily on how to increase the influence of academic research evidence on policy.  In health care in particular, this has tended to mean a focus on creating evidence synthesis (as the most robust and reliable form of evidence).  But this approach to the role of knowledge in policy sidesteps the question of what types of knowledge are actually used and valued in policymaking, and how different forms of knowledge may interact with policy.  Instead, we can ask - what do policymakers find useful and credible?  Why?  This question lets us explore the pathways to impact, and the different roles of evidence within policy and practice.

In this seminar, Kathryn will explore the implications of these strengths and limitations of credible knowledge in policy practices, and place our conclusions within a discussion of current approaches to understanding the role of knowledge in policymaking. She will close with some reflections on the importance of transparent and reflexive policymaking and knowledge-generation practices, and the implications of this for public health.

Please email penclahrc@exeter.ac.uk to register

Please note that this seminar will be recorded.

2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's

Videolink to MR11, John Bull Building, Plymouth Science Park and ECEHH F083, The Knowledge Spa, Truro

5th April 2019 10.30am-12.30pm 

Creative Communication Seminar Series

Workshop

 
We will also be holding a two hour workshop on Friday 5th April 2019 from 10.30-12.30 to provide people with the opportunity to turn these three steps into practice and develop a prototype board game based upon their own research. For an example of this, please see Alke's blog here: https://tactileacademia.com/2018/06/22/undisciplining-and-the-board-game-workshop/  

Please see the separate Workshop Eventbrite page http://bit.ly/2NAjXfd to register your interest in attending this workshop. Workshop capacity is limited to 20 people. If the event is oversubscribed, priority will be given to Early Career Researchers – so please book early to avoid disappointment!

Alternatively, please contact me directly on E.H.Shaw@exeter.ac.uk
G25, EMS Building, St Luke's 
5th April 2019  10am-1pm  Health Statistics Group - Stats Advice Clinics  For UEMS staff and UEMS research students
Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment. Telephone appointment can be held for those based in Cornwall.

Justin Matthews - South Cloisters, St Luke’s
Email: J.N.Matthews@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.
 
South Cloisters, St Luke's 
4th April 2019 3-4pm

Creative Communication Seminar Series

Seminar

Sharing through play - The board game as a potential dissemination strategy

Dr Alke Groppel-Wegener is an Associate Professor of Creative Academic Practice at Staffordshire University and was made a National Teaching Fellow in 2015. Bringing the creative methodologies of her design background to Learning and Teaching has led her to develop the Tactile Academia approach, which uses creative making activities and everyday analogies to explain complex concepts in simple terms. One of these is the use of the board game concept to disseminate both research process and findings to a range of audiences. Find out more about her work and workshops at www.tactileacademia.com
 
Event details:
Dr Groppel-Wegener will be delivering a 60 minute seminar on Thursday 4th April 2019, 1500-1600, open to all researchers and research facing professional service staff, covering:

  • How trying to get students to see writing as a process rather than an outcome led to experimenting with the board game analogy in her classroom.
  • The potential of using similar processes to illustrate and communicate research processes and findings to a variety of audiences (for example to a general audience or more specific stakeholder engagement)
  • A brief overview of her three steps of turning a process into a simple board game

For more information or to register to attend, please see the Eventbrite page: http://bit.ly/2VrfXk4

Alternatively, please contact me directly on E.H.Shaw@exeter.ac.uk

2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's
3rd April 2019 10-11am APEx Seminar

Identifying persons with multimorbidity who are most in need of proactive person-centred care in general practice
Dr Mieke Rijken, Senior Researcher, Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL)

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's

2nd April 2019 2-3pm APEx Seminar

Early detection research at Cancer Research UK
Dr Elizabeth Smethurst, Research Funding Manager, Early Detection Research, Cancer Research UK

Contact Joy Choules apexseminars@exeter.ac.uk  01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke’s Campus

29th March 2019 12-1pm Implementation Science Group: Learning, Knowing, Doing Seminar Series

Advocates, coordinators or detectives? The implementation of the ‘Freedom to Speak Up Guardian’ role in NHS organisations

Professor Graham Martin, THIS Institute, University of Cambridge

Employee voice is an important source of organizational intelligence about possible problems in service quality and patient safety, but effective systems for encouraging and supporting those who seek to speak up have remained elusive. A recent innovation in the English National Health Service to encourage voice takes the form of a novel organisational role: the Freedom to Speak Up Guardian. Intended to provide guidance and support for individuals with concerns and nurture cultural change about the importance of speaking up, the role has attracted significant investment—but is as yet unevaluated. We aim to address this gap, and to derive formative lessons for other health systems seeking to foster voice. Our data are drawn from 51 interviews covering the acute hospital, mental health, community care and ambulance sectors of the English NHS, as well as wider stakeholders and commentators, including individuals occupying the Guardian role and those involved in developing, implementing and managing it. We find that for managers, and particularly Guardians themselves, there are challenges in implementing the role in the way envisaged in policy. Many managers were keen to ensure that it focused on clearly defined problems of quality and safety. Those in Guardian roles, however, reported that the role was difficult to delimit so tightly. Colleagues approached them with more wide-ranging concerns that were nascent or difficult-to-articulate. Some concerns were not, on the face of it, obviously quality- or safety-related, but they nevertheless required careful interrogation—and could yield important insights into their organizations. Our analysis suggests that the focus—and, potentially, the principal value—of roles of this kind may be less in supporting and protecting whistleblowers in demanding a response to allegations of wrongdoing, and more in helping those with lower-level worries to make sense of their concerns and what to do with them.

Graham Martin is Director of Research for THIS Institute, a new unit funded by the Health Foundation at the University of Cambridge to develop the evidence base for and impact of work to improve healthcare quality and safety, and Professor of Health Organisation and Policy in the SAPPHIRE Group, University of Leicester. His research focuses on social, organisational and professional issues in healthcare system change, with a particular focus on quality improvement work and policy initiatives to address quality, safety and risk in the NHS.Please note that parking at each of the venues is very limited; please consider alternative means of travel.

To register, please email mailto:penclahrc@exeter.ac.uk

Presentations from previous seminars are available here:
http://clahrc-peninsula.nihr.ac.uk/learning-knowing-doing-lkd-seminar-series

Please note that this seminar may be recorded.

3.06, St Luke's

VC to MR12, John Bull Building, Plymouth Science Park & F083 The Knowledge Spa, Truro

28th March 2019  10.30am-12.00pm  Introductory-level process evaluation workshops - Spring 2019 

Introductory-level process evaluation workshops - Spring 2019 - Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations
These 90-minute workshops will introduce the basic principles of good process evaluation design. The three workshops are designed to build on each other, but you can attend only one if you wish.

1. Introduction to Process Evaluation
This workshop will introduce the key terms, concepts and design principles of process evaluation. It will also cover how to identify relevant research questions, select appropriate methods, and balance competing demands within a process evaluation.

2. Developing Theory and Logic Models for Process Evaluations    
The workshop will: outline the relevance of using a theory-based approach; discuss the practical application of different types of theory for process evaluation; demonstrate how logic models can be developed to underpin a good process evaluation; and discuss the benefits and challenges of using this approach.

3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations
This workshop will: introduce the rationale for using data integration techniques; summarise different techniques for integrating qualitative and quantitative data and datasets; discuss the application of data integration for different types of trial and research question; and discuss how to deal with conflicting data.

For more information about process evaluation see: http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/ihrprocessevaluation/

Times and dates
The workshops will be held at 10:30-12:00 on the following dates:
1. Introduction to Process Evaluation - Wednesday 13 March
2. Using Theory and Logic Models in Process Evaluations - Thursday 21 March
3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations - Thursday 28 March

Suitable for
Researchers and PhD students conducting process evaluations as part of randomised controlled trials. The workshops will assume basic familiarity with qualitative and quantitative research methods, and randomised controlled trials.

Registration
Please contact s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk to register for one or more of the workshops. If you have any questions or want to discuss any accessibility requirements, please contact s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk. Please bring a notebook/paper and a pen to the workshop(s).

WK Norman Room, Medical School Building, St Lukes Campus


Truro - Room F083, Knowledge Spa (via video-conference link)

 
27th March 2019  12.15-1.30pm  Clinical Education Seminar 

Engaging large groups in Medical Education
Dr Andrew Pye
National Teaching Fellow, College of Life and Environmental Sciences
CEC Penryn Campus, University of Exeter

This seminar will explore strategies for engaging large groups. Engaging students and facilitating learning can be incredibly rewarding. As group size increases, engaging students can become more challenging. This seminar will discuss the challenges faced during large group teaching and offer some strategies for engaging our students in a large group setting.

Dr Andrew Pye is Senior Lecturer in Biological Sciences. An innovative and enthusiastic educator, he supports colleagues across the University through facilitating the University’s Advance HE (HEA) accredited programmes (APP, PCAP and LTHE). He is also known for his work on academic tutoring and peer support. In 2018 Andrew was awarded a National Teaching Fellowship, the most prestigious individual teaching award in the UK, in recognition of his work promoting good practice in HE.

Programme:
Wednesday 27th March

  • 12:15  Tea and coffee EMS G18 St Luke's Campus
  • 12:30-13:15 Presentation: Engaging Large Groups in Medical Education (video linked to KSpa F10)
  • 13.15-13:30 Q&A
Registration:
Please register using this link to Eventbrite. If you wish to register without using Eventbrite by email or phone please contact c.pierce@exeter.ac.uk or 01392 406808

G18, EMS Building, St Luke's

Video link to KSpa F10

 
26th March 2019    Qualitative Research Advice Clinic 

These advice clinics have been set up to help to respond to qualitative research related queries from within PenCLAHRC and the Institute for Health Research. Whether you are a postgraduate student, an academic or a researcher who has a query about any phase of a qualitative project from design to writing up, you can book an appointment to speak with someone from the University of Exeter Medical School with general expertise in qualitative research who can advise and signpost. The clinics consist of 30-minute appointments with up to two advisors. To ensure that you gain the most from the clinic, please focus on clearly explaining one or two queries on which you would like to receive advice. We will send more guidance prior to your appointment on how to best use the time.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: https://store.exeter.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/nihr-clahrc-south-west-peninsula/qualitative-research-advice-clinic/08052019-qualitative-research-advice-clinic
 
1.13, College House, St Luke's 
26th March 2019  10.00am-12.30pm Exeter Clinical Trials Support Network  Are you involved in Clinical Trials?

If yes! the following network event has been organised for you.

The next Exeter Clinical Trials Support networking event takes place on 19 March 2019 .  Timings as follows:

10:00     Refreshments:  Coffee & Cake
10:15     Introduction/UK CRC SLA document (Shelley Rhodes, ExeCTU Senior Trial Manager)
10:30     International Trials:  HERA & ALTO (Lynne Quinn, ExeCTU Operations Manager)
11:00     Invited speaker – Prof Chris Butler – Clinical Director of the University of Oxford Primary Care Clinical Trials Unit
“Responsive adaptive platform trials in primary care:  The example of the 16-country Alice Trial of Antivirals for Influenza like illness”
12:00     Questions & Networking
12:30     End

Please RSVP to the CTSN Mailbox: ctsn@exeter.ac.uk

For information on video-link to remote sites please also e-mail ctsn@exeter.ac.uk
 
JS07, Smeall, St Luke's
21st March 2019 10.30am-12.00pm Introductory-level process evaluation workshops - Spring 2019

Introductory-level process evaluation workshops - Spring 2019 - Using Theory and Logic Models in Process Evaluations

These 90-minute workshops will introduce the basic principles of good process evaluation design. The three workshops are designed to build on each other, but you can attend only one if you wish.

1. Introduction to Process Evaluation
This workshop will introduce the key terms, concepts and design principles of process evaluation. It will also cover how to identify relevant research questions, select appropriate methods, and balance competing demands within a process evaluation.

2. Developing Theory and Logic Models for Process Evaluations    
The workshop will: outline the relevance of using a theory-based approach; discuss the practical application of different types of theory for process evaluation; demonstrate how logic models can be developed to underpin a good process evaluation; and discuss the benefits and challenges of using this approach.

3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations
This workshop will: introduce the rationale for using data integration techniques; summarise different techniques for integrating qualitative and quantitative data and datasets; discuss the application of data integration for different types of trial and research question; and discuss how to deal with conflicting data.

For more information about process evaluation see: http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/ihrprocessevaluation/

Times and dates
The workshops will be held at 10:30-12:00 on the following dates:
1. Introduction to Process Evaluation - Wednesday 13 March
2. Using Theory and Logic Models in Process Evaluations - Thursday 21 March
3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations - Thursday 28 March

Suitable for
Researchers and PhD students conducting process evaluations as part of randomised controlled trials. The workshops will assume basic familiarity with qualitative and quantitative research methods, and randomised controlled trials.

Registration
Please contact s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk to register for one or more of the workshops. If you have any questions or want to discuss any accessibility requirements, please contact s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk. Please bring a notebook/paper and a pen to the workshop(s).

WK Norman Room, Medical School Building, St Lukes Campus


Truro - Room F083, Knowledge Spa (via video-conference link)

20th March 2019 1-2pm APEx Seminar

Exercise Training for Chronic Heart Failure (ExTraMATCHII): our experience of performing an individual participant data meta-analysis
Dr Sarah Walker, Research Fellow, UEMS

AND

Completing a systematic review summarising screening tools used to predict physical frailty in adults aged 65 years and over. A dissertation project
Ellie Williams, BClinSci student, UEMS

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's

13th March 2019 10.30am-12.00pm Introductory-level process evaluation workshops - Spring 2019

Introductory-level process evaluation workshops - Spring 2019 - Introduction to Process Evaluation

These 90-minute workshops will introduce the basic principles of good process evaluation design. The three workshops are designed to build on each other, but you can attend only one if you wish.

1. Introduction to Process Evaluation
This workshop will introduce the key terms, concepts and design principles of process evaluation. It will also cover how to identify relevant research questions, select appropriate methods, and balance competing demands within a process evaluation.

2. Developing Theory and Logic Models for Process Evaluations    
The workshop will: outline the relevance of using a theory-based approach; discuss the practical application of different types of theory for process evaluation; demonstrate how logic models can be developed to underpin a good process evaluation; and discuss the benefits and challenges of using this approach.

3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations
This workshop will: introduce the rationale for using data integration techniques; summarise different techniques for integrating qualitative and quantitative data and datasets; discuss the application of data integration for different types of trial and research question; and discuss how to deal with conflicting data.

For more information about process evaluation see: http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/ihrprocessevaluation/

Times and dates
The workshops will be held at 10:30-12:00 on the following dates:
1. Introduction to Process Evaluation - Wednesday 13 March
2. Using Theory and Logic Models in Process Evaluations - Thursday 21 March
3. Integrating Data in Mixed Methods Process Evaluations - Thursday 28 March

Suitable for
Researchers and PhD students conducting process evaluations as part of randomised controlled trials. The workshops will assume basic familiarity with qualitative and quantitative research methods, and randomised controlled trials.

Registration
Please contact s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk to register for one or more of the workshops. If you have any questions or want to discuss any accessibility requirements, please contact s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk. Please bring a notebook/paper and a pen to the workshop(s).

WK Norman Room, Medical School Building, St Lukes Campus


Truro - Room F083, Knowledge Spa (via video-conference link)

8th March 2019  9am-1.30pm  Workshop by Dr Anu Kajamaa 

Applying the Change Laboratory method in practice to promote workplace learning
Workshop by Dr Anu Kajamaa
Associate Professor, Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Helsinki

Anu Kajamma, PhD, is an Associate Professor and leads the Learning, Culture and Interventions (LECI) research community at the Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland. Her activity-theoretical doctoral dissertation on health care change management was chosen as the Award winner by Emerald and the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD). She has conducted extensive collaborative research and intervention projects in health care in several countries, and produced multiple refereed publications in international health care and management journals. Recently, she received a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research and Innovation research funding for improving collaborative working between correctional services and mental health services. For more information please see her homepage: https://tuhat.helsinki.fi/portal/en/person/kajamaa, and the webpage of her research group: http://www.helsinki.fi/leci

  • 09:00-10:30 Workshop  “Applying the Change Laboratory method in practice to promote workplace learning”, WK Norman, St Luke’s
  • 11:00-13:00 Round table discussion around areas for collaboration with practioners and/or researchers at St Luke’s, WK Norman
  • 13:00-13:30 Sandwich lunch, WK Norman
Please confirm attendance by email to c.pierce@exeter.ac.uk or 01392 406808
 
WK Norman, St Luke's campus
7th March 2019  1.15-3pm  Presentation by Dr Anu Kajamaa 

The Change Laboratory as a tool for collaborative development in health care
Presentation by Dr Anu Kajamaa
Associate Professor, Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Helsinki

Anu Kajamma, PhD, is an Associate Professor and leads the Learning, Culture and Interventions (LECI) research community at the Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland. Her activity-theoretical doctoral dissertation on health care change management was chosen as the Award winner by Emerald and the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD). She has conducted extensive collaborative research and intervention projects in health care in several countries, and produced multiple refereed publications in international health care and management journals. Recently, she received a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research and Innovation research funding for improving collaborative working between correctional services and mental health services. For more information please see her homepage: https://tuhat.helsinki.fi/portal/en/person/kajamaa, and the webpage of her research group: http://www.helsinki.fi/leci

  • 13:15-13:45 Sandwich lunch, Seminar Room 9 RILD
  • 13:45-14:45 Presentation “The Change Laboratory as a tool for collaborative development in health care”, Seminar Room 9 RILD
  • 14:45-15:00 Q&A
Please confirm attendance by email to c.pierce@exeter.ac.uk or 01392 406808

RILD Seminar Room 9 
5th March 2019  12-3pm 

Institute of Health Research

Health Statistics Group – Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment

Dr Fiona Warren - Email: F.C.Warren@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice
 
Smeall Building, St Luke’s 
1st March 2019  2.30-3.30pm  Implementation Science Group: Learning, Knowing, Doing Seminar Series 

Brokering, bridging and bonding: the maturation of knowledge sharing and learning in applied health research?

Professor Justin Waring, Nottingham University
(Paper co-authored by Dr Rob Vickers)

The translational research agenda addresses gaps in knowledge creation, utilisation, and movement into the organisation and delivery of care. Many strategies and interventions have been developed to close these gaps and to share and co-produce knowledge across epistemic, cultural, and organisational boundaries. There has been much interest, for example, in how knowledge brokers can work across organisations and ‘get the right information to the right people at the right time’. But knowledge brokers can struggle to reconcile different forms of knowledge and manage competing expectations; research emphasises the importance of brokering activities or ‘chains’ involving inter-connected groups, rather than individual brokers.

In this project we examine shifts in knowledge brokering strategies and activities in applied health and care research. We delineate three different approaches to facilitating knowledge sharing and learning: 

1.    An individualised approach to translating knowledge, consistent with the knowledge broker concept. These often act like a metaphorical ‘boat’ for knowledge between disconnected communities; unlike existing studies we show this is a collective and dynamic activity, where groups of stakeholders ‘boat’ between different ‘entry and exit’ points.
2.    The development of more formal systems to facilitate knowledge exchange, from reporting procedures to computer systems. These allow for the systematic and standardised exchange of codified information but like a ‘bridge’ between two communities it involves relatively fixed ‘entry and exit’ points and considerable investment of resource.
3.    Efforts to nurture collaborative communities of practice, often building on brokering and bridging activities, in which different communities bond around shared knowledge and practices. This leads to the formation of new epistemic boundaries which support applied health research, but as with similar boundaries can be exclusionary of changing priorities.

The cumulative learning from these combined strategies can help close the gap between research and practice but there remains a risk that maturation involves ‘getting older’ without ‘getting wiser’.

Justin Waring is Professor of Organisational Sociology and Associate Dean for Research at Nottingham University Business School. He is also the lead for the ‘Implementing Evidence and Improvement’ Theme for NIHR CLAHRC-East Midlands, and the lead for the ‘Safer Care Systems and Transitions’ Theme for NIHR Greater Manchester-PSTRC. Dr Rob Vickers is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Health Information, Leadership and Learning, University of Nottingham. He is currently working on the Implementing Evidence and Improvement Theme for NIHR CLAHRC-East Midlands, examining knowledge brokering.

To register, please email mailto:penclahrc@exeter.ac.uk

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's

Video conferenced to MR12, John Bull Building, Plymouth Science Park & F083 The Knowledge Spa, Truro

27th February 2019 2pm  Guest lecture 

Radiological and Microbiological Challenges of Human Spaceflight

Ben Johnson, Marshall’s Scholar from the US
 
Ben is a postgraduate psychology student currently studying at the University of Edinburgh. His main interest is in addressing the challenges of promoting both physical and mental health in extreme environments, especially as found in space travel. He has worked at NASA, Johns Hopkins Medicine, and various universities, researching the psychology, physiology, and microbiology of human space flight. He will be presenting human microbiome research from the NASA HI-SEAS Mars simulation titled, "Inner Space in Outer Space: Microbial monitoring at the HI-SEAS Long Duration Mars Simulations” and radiological research from Johns Hopkins and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory titled, "Targeting the Medial Prefrontal Cortex to Ameliorate Radiation-Induced Neurobehavioral Deficits.”
 
To book onto this event, please contact s.dick@exeter.ac.uk - Samantha Dick.

If any academic or student groups would like to meet with Ben before or after this event for a more in depth conversation, please also contact Samantha.
 
3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
27th February 2019  2-4pm  NIHR Pitch & Putt Hustings Event 

This is a good opportunity to pitch your early grant ideas for NIHR applications.

Please remember everyone is invited whether you are pitching or not.  Post Docs welcome to pitch or be part of the audience.

The aims of the event  are:

  • To pitch early stage research ideas to develop proposals and connect with potential collaborators
  • To pitch formed research proposals to receive funder specific feedback
  • Provide the opportunity, as part of the audience, to gain knowledge of what is happening across the university
  • Provide opportunity for networking across all career stages of the academic community.

Actions:

If you are thinking of pitching, please remember it  isn’t about the fine detail but:

  • what is the question/problem
  • why is it novel
  • what is my approach to answering it
  • why am I in a really good position to answer/tackle it now OR what support/advice are you looking for
North Cloisters 12 (NC12), St Luke's (VC to Cornwall – ECEHH F083)
26th February 2019   Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

These advice clinics have been set up to help to respond to qualitative research related queries from within PenCLAHRC and the Institute for Health Research. Whether you are a postgraduate student, an academic or a researcher who has a query about any phase of a qualitative project from design to writing up, you can book an appointment to speak with someone from the University of Exeter Medical School with general expertise in qualitative research who can advise and signpost. The clinics consist of 30-minute appointments with up to two advisors. To ensure that you gain the most from the clinic, please focus on clearly explaining one or two queries on which you would like to receive advice. We will send more guidance prior to your appointment on how to best use the time.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: https://store.exeter.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/nihr-clahrc-south-west-peninsula/qualitative-research-advice-clinic/26022019-qualitative-research-advice-clinic

2.17, South Cloisters, St Luke's
14th February 2019 2.30-3.30pm  Seminar 

PERSEPHONE; 6 vs. 12 months of adjuvant trastuzumab in patients with HER2+ early breast cancer: A cost effectiveness analysis.

Professor Claire Hulme
Health Economics Group, Institute of Health Research, UEMS

Adjuvant trastuzumab has significantly improved outcomes for HER2+ EBC, using the 12m duration empirically adopted from pivotal registration trials. Given an annual per patient cost of trastuzumab treatment of over £30,000, a shorter duration has the potential to improve cost-effectiveness if efficacy is maintained.

This cost-effectiveness analysis was based on data from the PERSEPHONE trial, a phase III non-inferiority RCT comparing 6 to 12m Trastuzumab, the largest reduced-duration non-inferiority trial internationally. A landmark analysis 6 months into treatment was conducted, comparing costs and quality of life throughout follow-up (6m – 24m post treatment start). Multiple imputation was required to impute incomplete quality of life data. Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) were adjusted for differences at baseline. Uncertainty is estimated using the non-parametric bootstrap method. 4009 patients were disease free at 6m (6m: n=2000, 12m: n=2009) and therefore eligible for the analysis. The average costs for an individual in the 6m arm and 12 month arm were £2,538.64 (95% CI: £2,383.38 - £2700.72) and £12,333.83 (95% CI: £12,098.58 - £12,562.27), respectively, giving an average cost saving of £9,793.25 (95% CI: £9,515.86 - £10,071.64) per individual. Trastuzumab treatment and administration accounted for £9,699.58 (95% CI: £9,436.20 - £9.954.67) of this cost saving, the remaining arising from cardiac assessment and treatment costs and inpatient days. The average QALYs for an individual in the 6m arm and 12 month arm were 1.146 (95% CI: 1.131 – 1.161) and 1.128 (95% CI: 1.113 – 1.144), respectively, giving an average QALY difference of 0.018 (95% CI: -0.003 – 0.039). Thus, the 6m arm dominated with a probability of being cost effective of 100%. 6m of Trastuzumab was shown to be cost effective compared to 12m with cost-savings and no evidence of a detriment to quality of life.

Authors: Hulme C, Hall P, Shinkins B, Chehadah F, McCabe C, Dunn J, Hiller L, Earl HM. This research was funded by the NIHR HTA Programme (06/303/98). The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health

Please register your attendance at https://bit.ly/2E9cYcg

For further information please contact l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's Campus 
12th February 2019  10am-12pm 

Institute of Health Research

Health Statistics Group – Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment

Dr Beverley Shields - Email: b.shields@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advic.

 
RILD Building
(Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Wonford site) 
8th February 2019

1-2pm

APEx Seminar

Should clinicians measure blood pressure in 2019?
Prof Richard McManus, Professor of Primary Care Research, University of Oxford

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's 
5th February 2019

12.30-1.30pm

Refreshments available from 12 noon

IHR & Exeter Clinical Trials Unit Seminar

Measuring site performance in multicenter randomized trials

Prof Alan Montgomery
Director of Nottingham Clinical Trials Unit and Professor of Medical Statistics and Clinical Trials

Large multicentre trials are complex and expensive projects. Researchers focus great efforts on achieving recruitment targets, but this alone does not ensure overall success of a study. Other important factors include how well sites retain participants, and whether they can collect high quality, complete data in a timely manner. There is no consensus on the key metrics that should be used to measure site performance. A standardised set of clear and accessible summaries of site performance could facilitate early identification and resolution of potential problems, minimising their impact.
We used a comprehensive, mixed methods approach that we adapted from the COMET Initiative for developing core outcome sets in order to identify potential metrics and achieve consensus about the final set. I will present methods and results of the different phases of the project, demonstrate a practical tool that we developed to display key metrics during a study, and discuss future use and evaluation of the core set.

For further information please contact: j.jacob@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's 
25th January 2019 2.30-3.30pm Seminar

****Unfortunately it has become necessary to postpone this seminar, but we hope that you will be able to join us when it is rescheduled***

Severity Adjusted Probability Of Being Cost-Effective: A Novel Approach To Integrate Severity And Cost-Effectiveness With Applications To Norway And The Netherlands

Dr Matthijs Versteegh
Institute for Medical Technology Assessment, Erasmus University of Rotterdam

In the context of priority setting, a differential cost-effectiveness threshold can be used to reflect a higher societal willingness-to-pay for Quality Adjusted Life Year gains in the worse off. This can reflect distributional concerns for particular groups, such as those who are more severely ill. Now that more countries use such a framework –Norway and The Netherlands have formally adopted it - applying the framework correctly becomes even more important. In order to operationalize a decision model with severity-based thresholds, one needs to define severity and estimate it in the context of treatments. An often ignored issue in this context is the uncertainty surrounding estimates of severity. However, since all estimates of severity, which subsequently translate into higher or lower thresholds, are surrounded with uncertainty, this should be adequately dealt with. In his talk for Exeter staff, Matthijs will present a new method to integrate ‘severity based thresholds’ with cost-effectiveness models. He will also show a simple tool to calculate QALY losses for the UK, including uncertainty.

Please register your attendance at https://bit.ly/2E9cYcg

For further information please contact l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's Campus
23rd January 2019

4.00-5.30pm

Tea & coffee available from 3.30pm

Cardiovascular Health Research Group
Seminar Series, 17th Meeting

Rapid control of moderate and severe hypertension: safety and efficacy
Andrew Jordan
Consultant Cardiologist, Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation in heart failure
Grace Dibben
PhD Student, University of Exeter Medical School

ALL STAFF AND STUDENTS ARE WELCOME

JS07, Smeall Building, St Lukes

Video linked to Rm F10 Knowledge Spa, Truro

22nd January 2019 1-2pm  APEx Seminar  A future vision for general practice
Helen Stokes-Lampard, Chair, Royal College of General Practitioners

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

G18, St Luke's

Past Events 2018

Date  TimeTitleDescriptionLocation
19th December 2018 3-4pm Clinical Education Seminar

How do applicants from different social backgrounds choose which medical schools to apply to?

Eliot Rees is a PhD student in the Research Department at UCL Medical School working with Dr Katherine Woolf and whose research explores which factors influence applicants from different backgrounds choice of medical schools.  His doctoral research is exploring how applicants from different social backgrounds chose which medical schools to apply to.  He has undertaken a national qualitative interview study of applicants and medical students at eight UK medical schools, exploring what factors influence their choice.

Programme:

14:30-15:30 Festive mince pies, tea and coffee served in gallery outside South Cloister 3.06

15:00-15:45 Presentation by keynote speaker Eliot Rees: ‘How do applicants from different social backgrounds choose which medical schools to apply to?’

15:45-16:00 Q&A

Please click the link here to take you to the Eventbrite page to register.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
17th December 2018 9.15am-4.15pm Health Statistics Group workshop Introduction to Stata statistical software workshop
 
The workshop will assume no prior knowledge of Stata, but basic familiarity with spreadsheets and other statistical software (e.g., SPSS) is useful.  The topics covered in the workshop include: importing data from an Excel spreadsheet into Stata; generating new variables; basic statistical analyses (e.g., t-test, Chi-squared test); use of “do” files to save Stata commands used in analyses; and use of “log” files to save output from Stata analyses.
 
Please let me know via my e-mail if you would like to book a place (O.C.Ukoumunne@exeter.ac.uk)

2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's
13th December 2018 10.30-11.30am Process evaluation seminar

How does ‘implementation’ in process evaluation relate to the ‘implementation studies’ field? With Vashti Berry

Advanced-level round-table seminars on process evaluation

No need to register for the seminars. These seminars will assume some knowledge of process evaluation and/or the other topics being discussed.

A list of all the workshops and seminars is available on this webpage: http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/ihrprocessevaluation/events-seminars-and-training/
WK Norman, Medical School Building, St Luke's and F083, Knowledge Spa, Truro
12th December 2018   Qualitative Research Advice Clinic
For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students 
UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: https://store.exeter.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/nihr-clahrc-south-west-peninsula/qualitative-research-advice-clinic
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 7 working days prior to the event.
 
Room TBC, St Luke's 
5th December 2018

1-3pm

Health Statistics Group –
Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic
appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

Gary Abel - Email: G.A.Abel@exeter.ac.uk

Smeall Building, St Luke's 
4th December 2018

1-2pm

Implementation Science Group: Learning, Knowing, Doing Seminar Series Seminar

Maximising the university setting for knowledge mobilization in health services research: Co-production of an online educational resource with GPs in training

Dr Jessica Sheringham, Senior Research Associate, UCL

Jessica will present a study she has led to improve diagnostic decision making in future primary care clinicians. This work, funded by the NIHR Cancer, Awareness Screening and Early Diagnosis PRU, originated in a study to understand how GPs make decisions to investigate lung cancer. It led to the co-creation of an online educational resource using simulated patients with common symptoms that might be cancer. The resource – eCREST – was co-created with GP registrars and has been tested in three medical schools. The talk will use this example to focus on: the range of opportunities in university settings for knowledge mobilisation; the tension between a REF focus on the impact of knowledge generation vs. genuine co-creation of resources with partners; and the tension between students’ and educators’ wish to provide a ‘right answer’ vs. the clinical reality of diagnostic uncertainty.

Dr Jessica Sheringham is a Senior Research Associate at UCL, a member of NIHR CLAHRC North Thames Research Partnership Team, and a Consultant in Public Health. She uses mixed methods to study determinants of implementation. Her current work includes studies on improving pathways to a cancer diagnosis, self-management in asthma, and maximising the value of linked data. She also works on professional education and training and has developed online courses in screening, evidence-based practice, and clinical reasoning for Masters and medical students; co-written Mastering Public Health, a leading textbook on public health; and is an Examiner for the Faculty of Public Health international membership exams.

To register, please email penclahrc@exeter.ac.uk

Presentations from previous seminars are available here:
http://clahrc-peninsula.nihr.ac.uk/learning-knowing-doing-lkd-seminar-series

Please note that this seminar may be recorded.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's

Video conferenced to MR8, John Bull Building, Plymouth Science Park & F083 The Knowledge Spa, Truro

28th November 2018

1-2pm

APEx Seminar

Exploring the role of peer-led group-based interventions in the care of adult sexual abuse survivors
Judit Konya, UEMS Academic Clinical Fellow
AND
To beet or not to beet? That is the question – a brief review of dietary nitrate as a potential ergogenic and therapeutic aid
Sinead McDonagh, UEMS Research Fellow

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke’s Campus
27th November 2018

12.30-1.30pm

(Refreshments available from 12 noon)

Institute of Health Research & Exeter Clinical Trials Unit Seminar

Danish Centre for Intervention Research - building a scientific evidence base for health promotion and disease prevention through intervention research in real world settings

Rikke Fredenslund Krølner
Senior Researcher, at the National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark and Scientific Coordinator of Centre for Intervention Research

Rikke F. Krølner holds a Master of Science in Public Health and a PhD from the University of Copenhagen. Current research focuses on design, implementation and evaluation of school-based interventions among children and adolescents. She is Principal Investigator of two cluster-randomized trials - the Boost study aiming at promoting fruit and vegetable intake among adolescents and the Healthy High School study aiming at increasing wellbeing among adolescents by addressing multiple behaviours (physical activity, eating and sleep habits, stress management) and peer relations. Since 2009 Rikke has been affiliated with Centre for Intervention Research in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (since 2014 as a scientific coordinator of the centre). The research centre is based at the National Institute of Public Health, the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, domiciled in Copenhagen. It was established in 2009 following a large donation to provide a more robust scientific basis for interventions in local settings, such as municipalities. Rikke will discuss the centre’s portfolio of RCTs, approach to complex interventions and lessons learned from the 10 years of research at the centre.

For further information please contact: j.jacob@exeter.ac.uk
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's Campus
27th November 2018 2-3.30pm Qualitative research workshop Following a successful meeting about qualitative research and the REF with Professor Catherine Pope (University of Southampton) in September, we are now organising a follow up workshop.

All those doing qualitative research are invited to attend this workshop on Tuesday 27th November from 2 – 3.30 pm in South Cloisters room 3.06.

We ask you to bring with you a piece of qualitative research you are working on and that you are proposing to publish. If you have a paper already drafted but not yet submitted, that is perfect. Alternatively, bring a paper that you have already published, or come with a project in mind that you are intending to write up for publication.

In small groups we will work on writing and/or rewriting our abstracts so as to emphasise the originality, significance and rigour of our research (REF criteria), and discuss them with others.

Please contact Christabel Owens on c.v.owens@exeter.ac.uk  by Wednesday 21 November if you would like to attend this workshop, so that we can send you a brief document which explains what these 3 criteria mean, with examples from published qualitative research.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
22nd November 2018 1-2pm Qualitative Research Support Group

Crafting Communities of Health: The Work of Hope in Aging Japan

Unprecedented life expectancy and associated demographic changes in Japan have led to widespread anxieties about aging on several different scales: at the national level; in local communities; and on a deeply personal level. Communities and individuals are responding to the challenges of aging and of care in older age in various and often imaginative ways, crafting networks of support and strengthening social ties. In this paper I draw on ethnographic fieldwork in a community in Osaka, chosen for its high proportion of elderly, and describe some of its networks of support, focusing particularly on a Non-Profit Organization (NPO) which began as a mutual aid network (or tasukeai) inspired by the ideas of a well-known social activist. I focus on the activities of people involved in these networks of support, many of whom are themselves elderly or concerned about aging; in doing so I explore the broader social and organizational context within which hope arises, and move to explore the motivations of the people involved, outlining what I term an 'attitude of hope'. I argue that for those involved in community activities and support networks, hope is not a form of passive resignation but rather an active attitude and a form of citizenship.

Iza Kavedžija is a Lecturer in Anthropology at the College of Social Sciences and International Studies, University of Exeter. As an anthropologist of Japan, she began her research on aging, care and wellbeing in 2007 at the University of Oxford. She conducted intensive ethnographic fieldwork in the city of Osaka in 2008-9 and again in 2013. Iza’s monograph, entitled ‘Making meaningful lives: Tales from aging Japan’, is forthcoming with the University of Pennsylvania Press.

For further information, please contact Linda Dumchen: linda.dumchen@exeter.ac.uk
2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's
20th November 2018 10am-1pm Health Statistics Group –
Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic
appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

Sarah Walker - Email: s.walker@exeter.ac.uk
St Luke's
15th November 2018  10am-12pm  Exeter Clinical Trials Support Network  Are you involved in Clinical Trials?

Open to anyone currently or wishing to be involved in Clinical Trials. It is a free event and a great opportunity to meet and network with others involved in Clinical Trials and learn from each other.

Please RSVP to the CTSN Mailbox: ctsn@exeter.ac.uk

For information on video-link to remote sites please also e-mail ctsn@exeter.ac.uk
G27, Medical School Building (EMS), St Luke's 
14th November 2018 

4-5.30pm

Tea & coffee available from 3.30pm

 
Cardiovascular Health Research Group
Seminar Series, 16th Meeting
Improving access to rehabilitation for heart failure: an overview of REACH-HF
Hayes Dalal
Senior Clinical Researcher, Royal Cornwall Hospital NHS Trust
and Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer, University of Exeter Medical School

Are outcomes for HF and COPD patients better when caregivers are involved in the delivery of
self-management interventions? – A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
Miriam Noonan
PhD Student, University of Exeter Medical School

ALL STAFF AND STUDENTS ARE WELCOME
 
Smeall Building, Rm JS07, St Lukes Campus, Exeter

Meeting video linked to Rm F083 Knowledge Spa, Truro 
14th November 2018 10.30-11.30am Process evaluation seminar

What is the difference between realist evaluation and process evaluation? With Daisy Parker

Advanced-level round-table seminars on process evaluation

No need to register for the seminars. These seminars will assume some knowledge of process evaluation and/or the other topics being discussed.

A list of all the workshops and seminars is available on this webpage: http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/ihrprocessevaluation/events-seminars-and-training/

WK Norman, Medical School Building, St Luke's and F083, Knowledge Spa, Truro  
8th November 2018  10.30-11.30am  Process evaluation seminar 

Mixed-method mediation analysis for process evaluation With Obi Ukoumunne

Advanced-level round-table seminars on process evaluation

No need to register for the seminars. These seminars will assume some knowledge of process evaluation and/or the other topics being discussed.

A list of all the workshops and seminars is available on this webpage: http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/ihrprocessevaluation/events-seminars-and-training/
 
WK Norman, Medical School Building, St Luke's and F083, Knowledge Spa, Truro  
6th November 2018 5.30-7pm

Academy of Nursing

Annual Seminar Series

No Health without Mental Health

Why do we separate mental health and physical health and what are we doing to bring them together?
Mental health and physical health are in reality conjoined twins. Our mental wellbeing affects our physical health and our physical state has a huge impact on our mental health. And yet we often treat them as if our minds and bodies live on different planets. Come and hear how local initiatives are bridging the gap between mental and physical health, in particular improving mental wellbeing for people with long-term conditions.

Speakers:

  • Jonny Wilkins, Clinical Team Lead, Talking Health - DAS Long Term Conditions Team, Devon Partnership NHS Trust
  • Emma Tucker, Service Manager, Liaison Psychiatry Service, Devon Partnership NHS Trust
  • Marie Ash, Peer Support Worker, Devon Partnership NHS Trust and Joint Lead, Devon and Torbay Suicide Prevention Alliance

For further information and to book your place for this Seminar, please email Marte Lavender: m.lavender@exeter.ac.uk

Lecture Theatre, RILD Building, RD&E 
31st October 2018   Qualitative Research Advice Clinic
For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: https://store.exeter.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/nihr-clahrc-south-west-peninsula/qualitative-research-advice-clinic
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 7 working days prior to the event.

Room TBC, St Luke's
31st October 2018 1-2pm APEx Seminar

Cancer diagnosis trials in primary care – ECASS and ERICA
Professor Willie Hamilton, Professor of Primary Care Diagnostics

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
30th October 2018 3-4pm Exeter Health Economics Group

Health technology adoption in Canada: moving from appraisal to optimization

Dr Jeff Round
Institute of Health Economics, Alberta, Canada

This seminar will discuss how reimbursement and technology approval organisations are expanding the remit of health technology appraisal from narrow questions of health technology appraisals (HTA) to wider questions of health technology optimization (HTO). Typically decisions about whether or not some technology, intervention or programme should be funded are expressed as either a simple ‘Yes’ or ‘No’. This approach works well in cases where an intervention and its effects are both clearly defined and limited in scope. Health technology appraisal bodies such as NICE or CADTH frequently evaluate technologies in this fashion. In the Canadian province or Alberta, the HTA body responsible for such decisions is increasingly exploring decision making processes that go beyond individual appraisals to focus on wider questions of technology optimization. Jeff Round will draw on recent experience in Alberta of an appraisal and optimization programme around services for the treatment and rehabilitation of people who have suffered an ischemic stroke. He will illustrate the impact that focusing on optimization can have for a health system, and the challenges for analysts in moving to more complex decision making processes.

Please register your attendance at https://bit.ly/2E9cYcg

For further information please contact l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
17th October 2018 10.30am-12pm Process evaluation workshop

Integrating data in mixed methods process evaluations

Introductory-level training workshop

To register or discuss any accessibility requirements, please email  s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk

WK Norman, Medical School Building, St Luke's and F083, Knowledge Spa, Truro   
28th September 2018  2.30-3.30pm  Seminar Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme (EME)
Professor David Crossman

Professor David Crossman is the current EME Board Chair, with research interests centered on the inflammatory basis of atherosclerosis and the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction.  He is Bute Professor of Medicine and the Dean and Head of Faculty of Medicine at University of St. Andrews, Honorary Consultant Cardiologist for NHS Fife Health Board and Chief Scientist for Health, Scotland (from November 2017).

TBC
26th September 2018

8.40-11.45am

1.00-2.00pm

APEx seminar

Professor Tony Avery, Professor of Primary Health Care, University of Nottingham is coming to Exeter on Wednesday 26 September to co-host with Professor Jose Valderas, Professor of Health Services & Policy Research, UEMS, an APEx/AHSN-sponsored workshop on Patient Safety “Measuring Patient Safety in General Practice: the NIHR Patient Safety Toolkit Project and related initiatives” from 08.40 registration/coffee--11.45 (with lunch for those registered for workshop).

This will be followed by an APEx seminar by Professor Avery “Making a difference with your research: towards improving patient safety in primary care“ at 13.00.

All are welcome to attend both but as coffee and lunch have to be ordered for the workshop please email me to register as soon as possible if you wish to attend. Feel free to circulate this email if you have colleagues who you think would be interested in attending.

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's 
19th September 2018 10.30am-12pm Process evaluation workshop

Developing theory and logic models for process evaluations

Introductory-level training workshop

To register or discuss any accessibility requirements, please email  s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk
WK Norman, Medical School Building, St Lukes and F083, Knowledge Spa, Truro
12th September 2018 10.30am-12pm Process evaluation workshop

Introduction to process evaluation

Introductory-level training workshop

To register or discuss any accessibility requirements, please email  s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk
WK Norman, Medical School Building, St Lukes and F083, Knowledge Spa, Truro
10th September 2018 10.30am-12pm Process evaluation workshop

Process evaluation for non-RCT studies

Introductory-level training workshop

To register or discuss any accessibility requirements, please email  s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk
JS07, Smeall Building, St Lukes and F083, Knowledge Spa, Truro
7th September 2018 2-3pm Institute of Health Research Seminar The NIHR Academy: New Opportunities for all Health and Research Professions
Professor Dave Jones

Professor Dave Jones is the Dean for NIHR Trainees and a working clinical academic in the area of liver disease. He has a long track record in the area of academic training and led the recent review of NIHR Training which resulted in the development of the NIHR Academy which will launch in October 2018. He has a strong commitment to multi-professional opportunity creation and is the pioneer of the novel NIHR Academy Incubator model. He was awarded the OBE in 2018 for services to academic training.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's

With videolink to
F083, European Centre for Environment & Human Health, Knowledge Spa, Truro
Meeting Room 8, John Bull Building, Plymouth Science Park

5th September 2018

1-4pm

Refreshments on arrival at 12.30pm

QuEX Initiator Grant Seminar Economic Evaluation (cost-effectiveness analysis) in Alzheimer’s Disease/Dementia.
Discussing some key issues

Developing a dementia specific QALY measure (the AQ-5D)
Tracy Comans, Associate Professor in Health Economics, NHMRC Boosting Dementia Research Leadership Fellow, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

Modelling and evaluating care in Dementia
Kim-Huong Nguyen, Research Fellow in Health Economics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

CEA challenges for new DMT in AD
Ron Handels, Health Economist, Alzheimer’s Centrum, Lindburg, University of Maastricht, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

The HTA/CEA framework for Alzheimer’s Disease
Colin Green, Professor of Health Economics, Institute of Health Research, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK

Bring some questions with you……what do you see as key issues?

Please register your attendance at https://bit.ly/2AUBdZM
For further information please contact l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk
3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
23rd July 2018 10.30am-12.30pm IHR Early Career Researcher Network The Academic Woman’ hosted by Donna Poade. Donna has recently been awarded a Researcher Led Initiative Award and set up ‘The Academic Woman’ which highlights the research carried out by women at the University of Exeter. At this event we will be showing a recording of the presentation made by Professor Michelle Ryan as well as providing further information about future The Academic Woman seminars.

All are welcome to this event; male or female. Attendance is NOT RESTRICTED to Early Career Researchers.

If needed, I will send the door entry code when you confirm attendance.

Please let us know you’ll be attending by emailing Sarah Walker s.walker@exeter.ac.uk
Smeall JS07, St Luke’s campus
20th July 2018 2.00pm

Joint RSS South West Local Group and Exeter Health Statistics Event

Seminar

Methodological Advances in Evidence Synthesis

Orestis Efthimiou
University of Bern

Network meta-analysis (NMA) is an extension of the usual (pairwise) meta-analysis. It is a statistical tool for synthesizing evidence obtained from studies comparing multiple competing interventions for the same disease. In this lecture, we will go through some recent advances in the field. First, we will discuss a new model for the NMA of binary outcomes. This model generalizes the well-known Mantel-Haenszel method, and can be especially valuable for the case of rare events, e.g. when synthesising data on mortality or serious adverse events. The method has been implemented in R in freely available, easy-to-use routines. Second, we will discuss models for including non-randomized studies in NMA. Non-randomized studies can reveal whether or not interventions are effective in real-life clinical practice and there is a growing interest in including such evidence in the decision-making process. Here we present and compare an array of alternative methods, and we apply some of the methods in previously published clinical examples. Finally, we will discuss methods for individual participant data network meta-analysis (IPD-NMA). IPD are considered the gold standard in evidence synthesis, and inclusion of IPD in NMA offers unique advantages, such as increase in precision, decrease in heterogeneity, as well as the capacity to individualize the treatment according to a patients characteristics. We showcase our methods using an example from depression.

All Welcome
Tea will (hopefully) be served after the talk
For catering purposes, please register your attendance at Eventbrite, here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/statistics-seminar-presented-by-orestis-efthimiou-methodological-advances-in-evidence-synthesis-tickets-46926384078
2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's
12th July 2018 10.30-11.30am Learning, Knowing, Doing Series Brokering innovation in creating an evidence base for community services

Janet Harris, University of Sheffield
 
This session will centre on a project that works across government, university, healthcare, and community sectors to agree an evidence base for integrated health and social care services like social prescribing and community navigators. The Triple Helix framework is used to assess whether knowledge brokering can be used to promote innovation in generating evidence, looking at what has been needed to (a) create a Knowledge Space; (b) foster an Innovation Space, where evaluation methods are now being used to establish 'proof of concept'; and (c) create a Consensus Space where local government, NHS, the VCF sector and academics can agree on what’s valued.
 
Janet Harris is a Reader in Knowledge Mobilisation at the School of Health & Related Research (ScHARR) in the University of Sheffield. She previously worked in Boston, USA, on cross-sectoral community-based approaches to developing and evaluating large public health programmes and subsequently returned to England to complete a PhD in Public Health based on community-based participatory research.

To register, please email penclahrc@exeter.ac.uk

Please note that this seminar may be recorded

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's (VC to MR8, John Bull Building, Plymouth and F083, The Knowledge Spa, Truro
5th July 2018 12.30pm  APEx Barbara Starfield Lecture  4th Barbara Starfield Annual Lecture

Professor Jeannie Haggerty PhD
McGill Chair in Family and Community Medicine Research, McGill University, Montreal Canada

Continuity of care and the new normal of multimorbidity in primary care
- appreciating and extending Barbara Starfield’s notion of longitudinal person-focused care

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/apex-starfield-lecture-professor-jeannie-haggerty-tickets-43968325445

A sandwich lunch will be available following the lecture for people who have registered their attendance

From Professor Haggerty …..
Professor Barbara Starfield was a distinguished academic and health services researcher whose vision for Primary Care and General Practice centred health services was instrumental in providing solid theoretical foundations and the evidence for the provision of effective and cost effective health services.

Barbara Starfield proposed that while continuity of care is an attribute of good healthcare, it is uniquely expressed and valued in primary care as person-focused care over time, or longitudinality. So continuity in primary care has become virtually synonymous with establishing a therapeutic relationship with the patient and is often indicated by the extent to which a patient concentrates care in their GP. However, as it has become the norm for older adults to have two or more chronic conditions, so being seen by multiple clinicians and having multiple treatment plans has also become the norm. Her talk will summarise research on what patients say about the challenge of managing multiple providers and present why and how we need to expand the notion of continuity of care to include other clinicians, while underlying the value of person-focused care over time.

Professor Jeannie Haggerty’s domain of research is the measure of patient experience of patient-centred healthcare and measurement of access and continuity, and how these measures relate to changes in organizational and professional practices.

Jeannie has authored over 100 key papers in Health Services Research. She authored one of the seminal papers on the interdisciplinary concept of continuity of care that has been cited over 1000 times, and has informed policies through her health services  research in the field of primary care.

3.06, South Cloister, St Luke's 
4th July 2018  12.30-1.15pm

Institute of Health Research

Joint Seminar with Heath Statistics Group (UEMS) and Genetics Group

 

Don’t take it personally: careful causal analysis of claims for personalised medicine is long overdue

Prof Stephen Senn
Professor of Statistics

From former prime-ministers to captains of industry, all are convinced of the great potential for personalising the treatments of patients based on more and more measurement. A premise of the argument is the evident variation of ‘response’ in clinical trials. I claim we know much less about true causal variation than we think we do and that there is a surprising culprit for our misunderstanding: the evidence based medicine movement and its obsession with numbers needed to treat. I consider what we need to do to understand variation better and what the implications are for public health.

Prof Senn has recently retired but has had a distinguished academic career as Professor of Statistics at the Luxembourg Institute of Health (2011-2018) the University of Glasgow (2003-2011) and University College London (1995-2003). In addition to working as an academic he has also worked for the pharmaceutical industry in Switzerland and the National Health Service in England. He is the author of three books, Cross-over Trials in Clinical Research (1993 & 2002), Statistical Issues in Drug Development (1997, 2007) and Dicing with Death (2003). His expertise is in statistical methods for drug development and statistical inference.

Please email Leala Watson if you require further information: l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk
 
PMS lecture theatre, RILD Building
27th June 2018 10.30-11.30am APEx Seminar Series

Psychosocial interventions in cardiovascular disease
Professor David Thompson, Professor of Nursing, Queen’s University Belfast

Email: j.l.Choules@exeter.ac.uk to book your place

For further information visit: www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/apex/seminars

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's

(VC to F083, Knowledge Spa)

 
27th June 2018 12.45-1.45pm Clinical Education Seminar

Over Homer's Dead Body - Rejuvenating Medical Education. Seeking Help from Homer

Keynote speakers Robert Marshall and Alan Bleakley discuss their book ‘Rejuvenating Medical Education. Seeking Help from Homer’, in which the authors return to Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey for inspiration, using these epics as a medium through which to “think otherwise” about key issues in contemporary medicine and medical education.

WK Norman, St Luke's

20th June 2018  1-2pm APEx Seminar Series 

The At-Risk Registers Integrated into primary care to Stop Asthma crises in the UK (ARRISA-UK) trial: progress and plans for future work

Dr Jane Smith, Senior Lecturer in Primary Care
Dr Leon Poltawskiand Rachel Winder, ARRISA-UK Research Fellows, UEMS

The At-Risk Registers Integrated into primary care to Stop Asthma crises in the UK (ARRISA-UK) study is an ongoing UK-wide cluster randomised trial involving 270 GP practices that is investigating the effectiveness of a GP-practice level intervention in reducing severe attacks amongst high-risk asthma patients. Come and hear about study progress and plans for process evaluation work being led by members of APEx.

Email: j.l.Choules@exeter.ac.uk to book your place

For further information visit: www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/apex/seminars
 

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's

(VC to F083, Knowledge Spa)

18th June 2018  1-2pm  Seminar  Uptake of antepartum continence screening and pelvic floor muscle exercise instruction by maternity care providers: an implementation project

Associate Professor Helena Frawley
Monash University, Melbourne

Dr Helena Frawley is a pelvic floor physiotherapist and researcher. Alongside her position at Monash University, she is the Head of Cabrini Centre for Allied Health Research and Education, at Cabrini Health. Helena completed her PhD at The University of Melbourne in 2008, and gained Fellowship of the Australian College of Physiotherapists in 2011, as a Specialist Continence and Women’s Health Physiotherapist. She also holds an Honorary position at the University of Exeter Medical School, working with Sarah Dean, Tori Salmon, Rachel Jarvie and Rohini Terry on the APPEAL programme grant.

Her research is focused on pelvic floor muscle measurement studies and conservative therapies to treat pelvic floor dysfunction: pelvic organ prolapse, pelvic pain, incontinence and pelvic floor problems following pelvic surgery, including for pelvic cancer.  Her other research interest is translational research, including implementation of clinical practice guidelines.

Helena is active internationally in this area of work, as a member of several international working groups and committees. She is committed to improving pelvic floor function.

For further information please contact: Marilyn Evans (Marilyn.evans@exeter.ac.uk)

 
3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
14th June 2018

12-1pm

Workshop 2-4pm

Creative Communication Seminar Series

Creative Communication Seminar Series - Graphic Medicine

Ian Williams is a comics artist, physician and writer, now living in Brighton. He has studied Medicine, Medical Humanities and Fine Art and founded the website GraphicMedicine.org, coining the term that has been applied to the interaction between the medium of comics and the discourse of healthcare.

Daniel Locke is an artist and graphic novelist based in Brighton. Since 2013 much of his work has been informed and shaped by the discoveries of contemporary science. He's worked with Nobrow, Arts Council England, The Wellcome Trust and The National Trust.
We will begin with a talk by the artists about their work and how they address the challenges of communicating their ideas. Later Ian and Dan will lead a fun comic-book workshop where they will walk you through some of the skills and strategies they use in their books.

To book a place: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/creative-communication-seminar-series-graphic-medicine-tickets-45509632536

2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's.

VC to Plymouth Portland Square C403 and Truro KSpa F10
30th May 2018 12-1.30pm ESMI Guest Lecture Series

Methodology Guidance – Where are the methods?

There is an increasing stream of published “methodology  guidance” covering the conduct and reporting of almost every kind of observational study, randomised trial, systematic review and meta-analysis. In some cases, journals require that this guidance is followed as a condition for publication. But what are the methods that generate this guidance?

Using Network Meta-analysis (NMA) as an example, we look at guidance issued by GRADE (Grading of Recommendations  Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) and PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis). We find that, in common with the majority of “methodology guidance”, the GRADE and PRIMA extensions for Network Meta-analysis are based on no more than opinion, and issued without any explicit empirical or theoretical underpinning. We identify aspects of GRADE-NMA and PRSIMA-NMA that are incorrect or even incoherent, and illustrate alternatives.

The current approach to methodology guidance is leading to ossification and hegemonism, and feeds a “post-truth” agenda in which the investigator’s priority is conformity with guidelines rather than a search for scientific truth. We distinguish between prescriptive and descriptive methodology guidance, and suggest that a debate is needed on what form methodology guidance should take.

Tony is a Professor of Public Health Science at Bristol Medical School. Trained as a psychologist, influenced by structural linguistics, he eventually became an epidemiologist and statistician interested fitting things together.

For further information please email ESMI@exeter.ac.uk or refer to the weblink

3.06, South Cloisters

VC to Truro Knowledge Spa F083 and Plymouth John Bull Building MR8
18th May 2018 12-3pm Health Statistics Group –
Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Dr Fiona Warren - Email: F.C.Warren@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.
 
Smeall Building, St Luke’s
17th May 2018 11am-12pm
 
LKD Seminar

Data, Patients, Action!  Patient involvement in knowledge mobilisation in a Learning Health System
Sarah Knowles, University of Manchester

A Learning Healthcare System (LHS), which uses routinely collected data to enable rapid, potentially real time knowledge mobilisation, is being developed across the North of England through the Connected Health Cities programme. The LHS aims to use electronic health data to better integrate services, and identify and deliver rapid and sustained service improvements. Patients themselves are intended to be central to a high functioning LHS, but it is unclear what this could or should look like in practice. In this talk, I will argue that patients can contribute directly to both the ‘data’ and the ‘action’ stages of LHS improvement cycles. I will present findings from qualitative and co-design research projects exploring patient involvement in two Connected Health City themes of work, Stroke Care and Community Wound Care. The two cases illustrate how patient involvement can inform decisions about what data is collected and prioritised for improvement, and how patients can contribute to implementing changes and evaluating impacts to inform further learning. They also demonstrate the need to tailor opportunities for involvement to different patient groups. I will use the findings to illustrate the value of qualitative research, stakeholder involvement and implementation science in helping to address the barriers and realise the opportunities of LHS’s in practice.

To register, please email penclahrc@exeter.ac.uk

Please note that this seminar may be recorded
 

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's

VC to to F083, Knowledge Spa, Truro

16th May 2018 3-5pm Author workshop How to Write a Great Research Paper, and Get it Accepted by a Good Journal
Anthony Newman, Senior Publisher, Life Sciences Department, Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Knowing the best way of structuring your paper when writing it, and the most appropriate journal to send it to, really helps in getting your paper accepted. Also understanding how editors and publishers think and what they expect, and knowing how the peer review process works, is invaluable insight into the publishing process.

Results: After attending this free 2 to 2.5 hour workshop, one in the Elsevier Publishing Connect Workshop series, participants will have a clear idea of the steps needed to be taken before starting to write a paper. They will also be able to plan writing manuscripts using the logical step sequence – not the sequence in which the paper will be read. Authors are also made aware of what aspects of their papers Editors, Reviewers, and Publishers look at critically, and to ensure that in taking care of these areas, their papers are much more likely to be accepted. Dealing with referees’ comments and the art of polite rebuttal are also described such that these can be used to improve the submitted paper suitably. Sensitive areas such as publishing ethics, plagiarism, duplicate publishing, etc are also clearly explained such that participants have a clear understanding of what their responsibilities are, what is allowed, and what is not permitted.

Conclusions: These insights into the publishing process will enable the participants to be more confident as an author in the world of science publishing, and so should help them get their papers published more easily.

Information about the speaker:
Anthony Newman, who is making the presentation today, is a Senior Publisher with Elsevier, and is based in Amsterdam. Currently responsible for sixteen laboratory medicine and biochemistry journals, he joined Elsevier 30 years ago and has been Publisher for the last 19 years. Before then he was the marketing communications manager for the biochemistry journals of Elsevier.  By training he is a polymer chemist and was active in industry before leaving London and moving to Amsterdam in 1987 to join Elsevier.

VC between Laver LT6 at Streatham and W K Norman Conference Room at St Luke's
15th May 2018

12.30-1.30pm

(Tea/coffee available from 12 noon)

Exeter Clinical Trials Unit Seminar

The value of theoretically informed and methodologically rigorous qualitative process evaluation – more than barriers and facilitators.

Dr Julia Frost

Julia Frost is a Senior Lecturer in the Third Gap research group, which explores the ways in which evidence based treatments and management strategies are used (or not) in patients’ everyday lives, and the ways in which research evidence is used, understood, and contributed to by members of the public.

The Rehabilitation Enablement in Chronic Heart Failure (REACH-HF) intervention was developed to optimise self-care support for people with heart failure (HF) and their caregivers. A multi-centre randomised trial was conducted, and a qualitative process evaluation was undertaken to establish the fidelity of the intervention and characterise patients and carers observed and self-reported responses to the intervention. Findings suggest that the effectiveness of the intervention is contingent upon optimal alignment of trial ‘elements’ and demonstrates the need for process evaluations to integrate data from multiple sources to explain in which contexts and circumstances interventions work best.

ALL STAFF AND STUDENTS ARE WELCOME
Enquiries to Jo Jacob (J.Jacob@exeter.ac.uk)

G25, UEMS, St Luke's
9th May 2018 1-2pm

APEx Seminar Series

Why do people with long-term conditions get depression: unpicking the neurocognitive mechanisms

Professor Chris Dickens
Professor of Psychological Medicine UEMS

Why do people with long-term conditions get depression: unpicking the neurocognitive mechanisms
Professor Dickens will present findings from a preliminary study of emotional processing among people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. He will report how negative bias in the way individuals perceive emotions in others is linked to disease activity. This bias in emotional recognition could be used to further investigate mechanisms underpinning depression in future studies and in the development and evaluation of novel interventions for depression.

Email: j.l.Choules@exeter.ac.uk to book your place

For further information visit: www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/apex/seminars

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
25th April 2018 1-2pm

Clinical Education Seminar

How Policy and Research Can Inform Each Other

Tim Swanwick, Dean of Education and Leadership Development, Health Education England

Research and policy have a complex and, at times difficult relationship. Policy makers and researchers inhabit very different worlds, operate to different timescales and are spurred on by different sets of incentives. Academics are frequently disappointed when research evidence is considered only a minor factor, and occasionally disregarded, when policies are formulated, trialled and implemented. Similarly, policy makers are often frustrated by a lack of rigorous and relevant research evidence available to them within the time constraints of the policy cycle. In this interactive and participatory workshop we will consider the nature of policy, the different ways in which research may influence the policy process - and vice versa - and how researchers may be more impactful in the work that they do.

Tim Swanwick
Tim works across Health Education England, the NHS Leadership Academy and local leadership academy partners providing a national focus on clinical leadership development and leading on portfolio of projects from academic careers, to workforce transformation. Tim has worked in the NHS for over 30 years and in health professions education since the early 1990s, most recently as a Postgraduate Dean in London. He has a wide variety of academic interests including work-based learning, faculty development, professional support, academic training and clinical leadership and in addition to his work with Health Education England, Tim is an Honorary Senior Lecturer at University College London, Imperial College and Queen Mary University of London. A general practitioner by clinical background, Tim has researched and published widely both in his specialty and clinical education. His publications include the textbook Understanding Medical Education (2018, 2013 and 2010), Clinical Teaching Made Easy (2010) and the ABC of Clinical Leadership (2017 and 2010). Tim is regularly invited to present at healthcare education conferences including recent appearances in Helsinki (Finland), Barcelona (Spain), Washington (USA), Sao Paulo (Brazil), Copenhagen (Denmark), Lund (Sweden), Prague (Czech Republic), Toronto (Canada), Kyoto (Japan) and Singapore. Overseas consultancy has included work in Oman, Japan, Myanmar and South Africa.

Please register at Eventbrite (free): https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/how-policy-and-research-can-inform-each-other-tim-swanwick-tickets-44545385447

WK Norman, St Luke's Campus (video linked to KSpa F08) 
23rd April 2018 2.30-3.30pm

Learning, Knowing, Doing Series

The art of compromise: Collaboration between researchers and practitioners to co-produce applied health research

Roman Kislov, University of Manchester

Involving stakeholders and ‘research users’ in the design and implementation of applied health research is widely regarded as important. Such ‘co-production’ can be challenging because of the contrasting interests, perspectives, and needs of those involved. Drawing on experience of a large-scale UK-based collaborative research partnership across the NHS, third sector, and university, Roman will discuss how these challenges can be overcome through joint working, negotiation, and compromise and reflect on how such compromises influence the design, focus, and overall impact of applied health research.
 
Dr Roman Kislov is Senior Research Fellow in the University of Manchester and a Visiting Fellow in Queensland University of Technology. He conducts qualitative research on the processes and practices of knowledge mobilisation with a particular interest in communities of practice, intermediary roles, organisational learning, and implementation of change.

To register, please email: penclahrc@exeter.ac.uk

Please note that this seminar may be recorded

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's. VC to MR8, John Bull Building in Plymouth and F083, The Knowledge Spa in Truro
18th April 2018 12.30-3pm

Creative Communications Seminar

Creative Communications Seminar: Reaching New Audiences.

Tara Lamont and Kirsty Heber-Smith

Tara Lamont is deputy director of the NIHR Dissemination Centre which promotes NIHR and other research findings to decision-makers in health and care. Tara will be talking about ways of reaching non-academic audiences, tailoring outputs and using appropriate platforms and approaches to improve the reach and impact of research.

Kirsty Heber-Smith, science communicator from the University of Oxford will be giving a talk on the university’s digital interactive platform Oxford Sparks and how researchers can use social media to interact with a new audience.

Kirsty will then lead a Q&A session from 2–3 pm.

To book a place - https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/creative-communication-seminar-series-tickets-44033368992

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's. VC to Plymouth JBB MR8 and Truro KSpa F05 
17th April 2018 AM/PM

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/conferences-events/nihr-clahrc-south-west-peninsula/qualitative-research-advice-clinic

1.27, South Cloisters, St Luke's Campus
10th April 2018 10am-1pm

Health Statistics Group –
Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Sue Ball - Email: S.Ball3@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's Campus 
4th April 2018 1-2pm

APEx seminar

A randomised trial of the addition of mirtazapine for patients with depression in primary care who have not responded to antidepressant treatment.

Dr David Kessler
Reader in Primary Care, Bristol Medical School

Antidepressants are often the first line of treatment for major depression, but only half of those treated with a single drug respond. For patients in primary care who had not responded to a single antidepressant, we investigated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of combining mirtazapine with Serotonin-Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitor (SNRI) or Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants. This two parallel-group multi-centre, placebo controlled, randomised trial recruited 480 participants aged over 17 years with treatment resistant depression. The results of this trial will be presented.

Join us afterwards for our informal monthly APEx meeting: updates on progress in APEx and networking (refreshments will be served)

Email: j.l.Choules@exeter.ac.uk to book your place

For further information visit: www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/apex/seminars

JS07, Smeal Building, St Luke's Campus (VC to F083, Knowledge Spa) 
26th March 2018 2-3pm

Learning, Knowing, Doing Series

Seminar

Staging evidence: the implications of clinical mindlines for knowledge mobilisation
Kate Beckett, University of the West of England

Kate’s background is in Nursing, Midwifery, Anthropology and Psychology. She currently holds a NIHR Knowledge Mobilisation (KM) Research Fellowship. Her KM research at the interface between academia and practice focusses on traumatic injuries and their psychological impact.

Kate’s NIHR KM fellowship project entitled ‘Enhancing Post-injury Psychological Care (EPPIC)’- uses a form of participatory theatre called Forum Theatre as a medium for knowledge mobilisation. Her work involves NHS patients and practitioners in creative activities/co-production and aims to integrate research evidence with patient and practitioner experience to bring about service improvement. Based on Gabbay and Le May’s work on mindlines, Kate’s work challenges the way in which knowledge is used to inform effective practice and she will explore this with the audience.

To register, please email penclahrc@exeter.ac.uk

Please note that this seminar may be recorded

2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's, videoconferenced to MR8, John Bull Building, Plymouth and F083, The Knowledge Spa, Truro 
21st March 2018 1-2pm APEx Seminar

SPOtting Cancer among comorbidities (SPOC): do pre-existing conditions delay diagnosis of cancer?
Dr Luke Mounce, DISCO, UEMS

Time-dependent variation of PRO measurements in patients with chronic health conditions: A systematic scoping review
Antoinette Davey, PhD Researcher, Health Services & Policy Research Group, UEMS

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke’s Campus (NO video conferencing to F083, Knowledge Spa)
15th March 2018 11am-12pm
Tea/coffee available from 10.30am
Exeter Clinical Trials Unit Seminar

Dr Michael Tvilling Madsen
Center for Surgical Science, Department of Surgery, Zealand University Hospital.
Graduat School of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen.

Michael’s research has a predominant focus on patient reported outcomes in surgical and medical patients. Sleep, circadian rhythm, depression and anxiety have been his primary areas of expertise in patients with cancer and following acute coronary syndrome. He has been involved in 2 randomized controlled trials investigating Melatonin of which he was the sponsor/investigator of the MEDACIS trial (NCT02451293). Ongoing research involves cohort studies using repeated measured design in patients with colorectal cancer.

About the MEDACIS trial
Depression and depressive symptoms are prevalent and represent a heavy burden for affected patients following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The prevalence of depression have consistently been shown to be around 20%, however, depressive symptoms have been reported as high as 50% assessed with depression questionnaires. The MEDACIS trial tested Melatonin as primary prophylaxis for prevention of depression in patients following ACS over a 12 week period. The seminar will present the primary findings of the MEDACIS trial.

ALL STAFF AND STUDENTS ARE WELCOME
Enquiries to Sarah Dean (S.Dean@exeter.ac.uk) or Jo Jacob (J.Jacob@exeter.ac.uk)

G25, Medical School Building, St Luke's Campus
15th March 2018 1-2.30pm ESMI Guest Lecture Series

Campbell Collaboration : Better evidence for a better world

Dr. Vivian Welch, Editor in Chief of the Campbell Collaboration, will introduce the types of evidence synthesis conducted by the Campbell Collaboration across social sciences including international development, social welfare, crime & justice, education and knowledge translation and implementation, including their impact.

She will also describe ongoing research on an evidence gap map of ageing and current research being led by the Campbell and Cochrane Equity Methods Group.

Vivian is a Clinical Epidemiology Methodologist at the Bruyère Research Institute, lead of the BRI Method Centre, Assistant Professor at University of Ottawa, and Deputy Director of the Centre for Global Health, University of Ottawa.  Vivian's research interests include systematic reviews, health equity, global health, knowledge translation and clinical guidelines.

WK Norman, St Luke's Campus
9th March 2018 12-1pm Institute of Health Research

Health Economics Group Seminar

EQ5D: 3L, 5L what the L?

Professor Allan Wailoo
University of Sheffield

EQ-5D is the most widely used measure of health-related quality of life for economic evaluation. It is NICE’s preferred measure. To date this has been the 3-level version (3L), but a newer 5-level version (5L) has been produced by the EuroQoL group. 5L was intended to retain many of the features of 3L but be more sensitive.
However, there are differences between the two versions in terms of both the descriptive system and the valuations for health states. These differences raise difficult issues for decision makers seeking consistency.

This talk will discuss work that has been done by a team in Sheffield looking at differences between 3L and 5L. It will show how one can estimate 3L from 5L, and vice versa, using either patient level data or summary statistics. It will then show the expected outcome of moving from 3L to 5L in a series of trial based cost-effectiveness
studies, and a sample of NICE Technology Appraisals. The differences are substantial. Finally, the talk will outline ongoing work being undertaken for NICE and DH that will help determine whether and how to use 5L in
future economic evaluations.

For further information please contact l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk
3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
27th February 2018 11am-12pm Creative Communications Seminar

This seminar aims to explores how to create engaging oral presentations. Jointly delivered by Michelle Ryan from the University of Exeter and Giles Yeo from the University of Cambridge, this seminar will showcase different approaches to engaging your audience and making oral presentations less dull. The seminar will be followed by a workshop led by Giles Yeo entitled ‘Why, How, What?’ in which participants will have the opportunity to put into practice the tips they’ve learnt in the seminar.  Can you come up with a ‘Why, How, What?’ for your project for a non-expert audience?  Can you do that in 10 seconds or less? Come along and find out more!

Michelle Ryan, Professor of Social and Organisational Psychology at the University of Exeter.
Giles Yeo, Principal Research Associate in Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge (and occasional TV presenter).

To book a place - https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/creative-communication-creating-engaging-oral-communications-tickets-42121839556

3.06 South Cloisters, St Luke's with VC to
Plymouth JBB MR8 and Truro KSpa F10
23rd February 2018  12.30-1.30pm  Institute of Health Research

Health Statistics Group
Seminar 

The good the bad and the ugly – what we really do when we identify the best and the worst organisations?

Dr Gary Abel
Primary Care, University of Exeter Medical School

Performance and quality indicators are in widespread use in the health arena and beyond. They are used in such diverse applications as pay for performance for general practices, safety monitoring of hospitals and individual surgeons, and for examining geographic inequalities in public health issues. In the vast majority of cases these indicators are constructed by aggregating individual patient data and as such are based on finite samples. These finite samples result in chance influencing individual indicator values. Sometimes this chance is recognised and sometimes it is not. It is often assumed that using funnel plots, or calculating z-scores (with or without accounting for overdispersion) allows chance variation to be accounted for and are thus robust methods for identification of good and poor performance. I will examine three commonly used methods for identification of the best and worst performing organisations using simulation. These simulations show that, if a funnel plot is needed to represent the data, the data are not generally suitable for use as a quality indicator and will result in a high degree of misclassification whichever method is used.

Please email Leala Watson if you wish to attend: l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk
 
3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's Campus 
21st February 2018 1-2pm APEx seminar

Community-based social innovations for healthy ageing: evidence from middle income countries

Dr Emma Pitchforth, Senior Research Fellow in Primary Care, UEMS

For further information visit: www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/apex/seminars

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's Exeter (NO video conferencing to Truro) 
19th February 2018 3pm– 4pm Learning, Knowing, Doing series

Supporting applied health services through knowledge translation: The Canadian scene

Professor Anita Kothari, Western University

Anita Kothari is an Associate Professor with the School of Health Studies at Western University in Ontario. She is interested in understanding how to best support the use of research and knowledge in healthcare decision-making, with a particular focus on integrated knowledge translation. Anita is also interested in public health systems and services research.

In this talk, she will discuss the concepts of knowledge mobilisation, knowledge translation and implementation science from the Canadian context. She will use examples from her research to illustrate the nuances of integrated knowledge translation in contrast to co-production approaches.

To register, please email penclahrc@exeter.ac.uk

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's Campus.


Videoconferenced to MR8, John Bull Building, Plymouth and F083, The Knowledge Spa, Truro.

6th February 2018 11.30am-12.30pm ESMI Guest Lecture Series

Increasing value and reducing waste in implementation research

Jeremy Grimshaw, Ottowa Hospital Research Institute

Implementation research is the scientific study of the determinants, processes and outcomes of implementation.

Whilst there is an increasing body of implementation research, we are not advancing knowledge as efficiently as we could.

There is considerable waste in implementation research (as in all other areas of health research) particularly due to failures to ask the right research questions, failures to use current available evidence when planning future research and failures to maximise the informativeness of syntheses of implementation programs.

The seminar will discuss these issues and offer suggestions to enhance value and reduce waste.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's. Video link  to Knowledge Spa F083, Truro and John Bull MR9, Plymouth
5th February 2018 12-1pm ESMI Guest Lecture Series

Seeing the forest and the trees – getting more value out of systematic reviews of complex interventions

Jeremy Grimshaw, Ottowa Hospital Research Institute

Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of complex interventions raise conceptual and methodological challenges that traditional systematic review and meta -analysis approaches fail to address.

We have undertaken a series of systematic reviews of diabetes quality improvement interventions (published
in JAMA 2006 (50 trials), Lancet 2012 (142 trials), Cochrane Library in preparation (278 trials)).

To enhance the value of the systematic review, we have explored procedural (contacting authors) and statistical (Bayesian hierarchical multivariate analyses) innovations to extract more information for decision makers  planning diabetes quality improvement activities.

We are also converting the current update into a living (complex) systematic review to maintain a current  systematic review for decision makers.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's. Video link  to Knowledge Spa F083, Truro and John Bull MR10, Plymouth
29th January 2018 11am-12pm Seminar

A life with no Windows. A 12 month exploration into living in an Open Science world, outside of the Intellectual Property kingdom

Dr Mike Allen
Senior Modeller, PenCHORD

How free are you to share what you work on? How free are others to use what you have learned? How much, in academia, do we really freely share what we learn with wider society?

Free Open Source Software (FOSS) is a movement that advocates free sharing of knowledge. In this short seminar I will talk about my experience of trying to make everything I do freely available to others, from data, to software, to research (the algorithms we used and developed), to publication. I won’t try and tell you what choices you should make. Rather, I shall share my experiences of trying to work in a world that uses and shares knowledge completely freely (thankfully very, but not completely, positive).

I will talk about what it is like to try and live in the academic community without Microsoft Windows and Office, or Apple OSX, or any other commercial software.

Please email penclahrc@exeter.ac.uk to register your attendance.

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke’s campus with video conferencing link to MR8, John Bull Building, Plymouth and F83 in Truro
24th January 2018 10-11am ESMI Guest Lecture Series We can see the forest, but where are the trees?  Methods to bridge diversity and meta-analysis

G J Melendez Torres, Cardiff University G.J. Melendez-Torres Seminar

W K Norman, St Luke’s. Video link to Truro, Knowledge Spa F083 and Plymouth, John Bull Building MR10
18th January 2018 6.30-8pm APEx Barbara Starfield Lecture Prof Barbara Starfield was a pioneer that developed the scientific foundations for research on the organisation and delivery of Primary Care, and her work remains a source of inspiration for medical students and leading researchers alike. The Exeter Collaboration for Academic Primary Care (APEx) has set up the Barbara Starfield Annual Lecture to promote the dissemination for research relevant to the organisation, delivery and practice of Primary Care.

We are delighted to introduce as the speaker this year Professor Amanda Howe, President of WONCA and Chair in Primary Care at the Norwich Medical School.

If you wish to register for this event please sign in to Eventbrite:
https://apex-starfieldlecture.eventbrite.co.uk
St Luke's Campus
16th January 2018 10am-1pm Health Statistics Group –
Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries. Please email to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Dr Sarah Walker. Please email: s.walker@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

St Luke's Campus
10th January 2018  1-2pm  APEx seminar  "It's the sustainability, stupid!" - why health and social care need a new snowclone to survive

Tim Malone (NHS Research Fellow, RD&E), Niall Macleod (GP, Exeter), Andrew Gunther (Senior Planning & Public Health Officer, Torbay Council). All NHS England/Public Health England Sustainability and Health Ambassadors for Devon

For further information visit: www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/apex/seminars
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's Exeter (and video conferencing with F083 Knowledge Spa)

Past Events 2017

Date  TimeTitleDescriptionLocation
19th December 2017 10am-1pm Health Statistics Group -  Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries. Please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Justin Matthews - Email: J.N.Matthews@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke’s 
7th December 2017 6.30pm Annual Barbara Starfield Lecture

The Annual Barbara Starfield Lecture will this year be on Thursday 7 December at 18.30 on St Luke’s Campus and be presented by Professor Amanda Howe, Professor of Primary Care, Norwich Medical School and President of World Organisation of Family Doctors (WONCA).

Details will follow soon but hold the date. Her title is “Evidence, advocacy and resourcing – can global general practice meet the challenge of universal health coverage?”

St Luke's Campus
6th December 2017  1-2pm  APEx seminar 

Mental health in GP/patient consultations

Dr Joe Ford, Postdoctoral Research Associate, UEMS with Professor Rose McCabe and Professor Katrina Wyatt

The DeSTRESS project is an investigation into the pathologisationof stress in low-income communities. Preliminary findings will be presented: ways in which GPs diagnose and treat MH problems; ways in which they ask patients to self-refer to MH services; and general conversational styles adopted in interactions. The team would also welcome attendees’ views and observations.

Email: j.l.Choules@exeter.ac.uk to book your place.

For further information visit: www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/apex/seminars

JS07 Smeall St Luke's with a video link to F083 in the Knowledge Spa
5th December 2017 10am-12pm Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 7 working days prior to the event.

G13, College House, St Luke's 
21st November 2017 12.30-3.30pm Health Statistics Group -  Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries. Please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Associate Professor Obi Ukoumunne - Email: O.C.Ukoumunne@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke’s 
8th November 2017 10am-12pm Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 7 working days prior to the event.

1.05, College House, St Luke's
18th October 2017  1pm  APEx Seminar Research into apps for supporting behaviour change

Sam van Beurden and Jeff Lambert (UEMS researchers) will each be giving two short seminars on Wednesday 18 October at 13.00 in JS07 Smeall (with video link to F083) on “ImpulsePal: an app a day keeps the cravings away” and “Pilot evaluation of a web-based intervention for physical activity and depression” respectively.

Please come and support these PhD students. Details http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's 
18th October 2017  4-5pm  Complex Interventions Research Group seminar 

Randomised controlled trials of behavioural interventions: lessons learned and current work at the Health Behaviour Change Research Group at NUI Galway

Drs Elaine Toomey & Molly Byrne, National University of Ireland, Galway

ALL STAFF AND STUDENTS ARE WELCOME
Enquiries to Lucy Evans (L.Evans@exeter.ac.uk)
 
TBC, St Luke's 
16th October 2017  12-1pm  A seminar hosted by the Complex Interventions Research Group  The MindSpot Clinic: Outcomes from an Australian virtual mental health service for adults with anxiety and depression

Professor Nick Titov, Co- Director eCentre Clinic and Director of Mindspot - Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia

https://www.ecentreclinic.org/
http://humansciences.mq.edu.au/psychology/psychology_staff/psychology_academic_staff/nick_titov

Abstract to follow

ALL STAFF AND STUDENTS ARE WELCOME
Enquiries to Lucy Evans (L.Evans@exeter.ac.uk)
 
Meeting room TBC, UEMS, St Lukes 
13th October 2017  11.30am-12.30pm Wellcome Trust Funding Presentation

Researchers and staff interested in Wellcome Trust funding are invited to attend a funding presentation and afternoon sessions with the Wellcome Trust research services team.

During the funding presentation members of the team will provide an update on current and future opportunities, and be available to answer questions from the audience.

Please note: later in the day we will also be running smaller, focused sessions on:

  • Biomedical research funding (13.30 - 15.00)
  • Medical humanities and social sciences (13.30 - 15.00)
  • Population health (15.00 - 16.00)
  • Public engagement (15.00 - 16.00)
To register for the main presentation (11.30 – 12.30) and afternoon funding sesisons please sign up through Google Forms.

Living Systems Institute Seminar Rooms - Video link to 3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
13th October 2017 12-1pm Insitiute of Health Research Seminar

Enhancing the social and cultural relevance of interventions

Professor Sally Wyke
Deputy Director of Institute of Health and Wellbeing, Research Professor at the University of Glasgow

The evidence and theory supporting innovation in behaviour change interventions are building at an exciting pace but the scale of the international public health challenge remains enormous.  In this presentation Sally argues that if, in intervention development and research, we pay even more attention to the essentially social nature of health-related behaviours, and if we recognise and work with the cultural context within which health and other behaviours are enacted and reformulated over time, we can improve both the reach and effectiveness of our programmes.  In essence, we argue for greater integration of what Wright-Mills called the ‘sociological imagination’ into programme development. 

To make this case we draw, amongst other evidence, on our experience of developing and evaluating the ‘Fans in Training’ set of programmes, the first of which is the highly successful, award-winning, Football Fans in Training (FFIT) programme.  FFIT is gender-sensitised in relation to context (the traditionally male environment of football clubs and men only groups), content (information about the science of weight loss presented simply, discussion of alcohol and its potential role in weight management, and branding with club insignia), and style of delivery (participative with time devoted to interaction amongst participants for vicarious learning and mutual support).  This, and subsequent programmes in professional sports and faith-based settings we are developing, are explicitly designed to work with rather than against existing cultural identities in attracting and engaging participants in change and, through multiple opportunities for interaction, to support long-term change and the negotiation of new, more ‘healthful’ identities.

Sally concludes that a more interdisciplinary approach to the development and delivery of health improvement programmes can both enhance their reach and effectiveness and potentially contribute to wider scale cultural change at a societal level.  

Hunt, K, Wyke, S, Gray, CM, Anderson, A, Brady, A, Bunn, C, Donnan, PT, Fenwick, E, Grieve, E, Leishman, J, Miller, E, Mutrie, N, Rauchhaus, P, White, A & Treweek, S (2014) ‘A gender-sensitised weight loss and healthy living programme for overweight and obese men delivered by Scottish Premier League football clubs (FFIT): a pragmatic randomised controlled trial.’ The Lancet. Vol 383. April 5.

For further information please contact j.frost@exeter.ac.uk

F20, EMS Building, St Luke's
13th October 2017 10am-1pm Health Statistics Group -  Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries. Please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Professor William Henley - Email: W.E.Henley@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's
29th September 2017  1.30-2.30pm APEx Seminar 

Sharing medicine

Dr Richard Lehman, Honorary Senior Research Fellow, University of Birmingham

Dr Richard Lehman is the editor of the"Sharing Medicine" series in JAMA Internal Medicine. In his view the future of medicine cannot consist simply of big data processed by big machines, with clinicians standing back and accepting the printouts. Of course, the analysis of information in many databases may well produce important advances in knowledge and treatment, but these advances will invariably have to be made meaningful through a process of shared understanding. Such understanding begins with clinicians as individuals. It is shared between clinicians within our community of learning and practice. It is shared with patients in every clinical encounter. The future of medicine lies in sharing medicine. The talk will expand on these themes.

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's (with video conferencing to F083, Knowledge Spa) 
27th September 2017  10am-12pm  Qualitative Research Advice Clinic 

For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 7 working days prior to the event.

1.27, South Cloisters, St Luke's
20th September 2017

2-5pm

Health Statictics Group - Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Dr Beverley Shields,
Email: b.shields@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

RILD Building
(Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Wonford site)
19th September 2017

1.00-4.30pm

Session for PGR supervisors

There will be a training session covering all aspects of postgraduate research (PGR – MPhil/PhD/MD/MByRes) supervision to be held on the afternoon of Tuesday 19th September from 1 p.m. until 4.30 p.m. in Smeall, JS07 at St Lukes, Exeter.  Whilst the session is primarily aimed at new/less experienced supervisors (and people who would like to become supervisors) and those people who have recently arrived at Exeter, current more experienced supervisors are also very welcome.

To register and for further information please contact Nick Chruch N.J.Church@exeter.ac.uk.

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
15th September 2017

1pm

Seminar

Alison Marsh from the Royal College of General Practitioners is coming to Exeter to talk about the RCGP Impact from Research. She will give a short seminar and then be available for one-to-one meetings (booked in advance through Joy) to discuss this initiative.

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
8th September 2017

12-1pm

PenCLAHRC/Complex Intervention Research Group Seminar

Frailty: Recent clinical advances and next steps for research

Dr Andy Clegg, Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant Geriatrician, University of Leeds and Bradford Teaching Hospitals.

Andy led the development, validation and national implementation of an electronic frailty index (eFI) using routine primary care electronic health record data from around 900,000 patients in the ResearchOne and THIN databases as part of the NIHR CLAHRC YH programme. He is PI for the Home-based Extended Rehabilitation for Older People (HERO) trial, which is a multi-centre RCT evaluation of a home-based exercise intervention for older people with frailty after acute illness or injury (n=718), funded by the NIHR HTA programme. The HERO trial is a collaboration between the University of Leeds and University of Exeter.

Andy is also joint PI for an NIHR Programme Grant to optimise and evaluate personalised care planning to improve quality of life for older people with frailty, which will lead to a definitive cluster RCT evaluation involving 2,000 participants across 40 general practices. He is also PI for the Community Ageing Research 75+ (CARE 75+) study, which is a multi-site prospective cohort study using a 'Trial within Cohort' design to investigate frailty, disability and quality of life trajectories in older age, and evaluate interventions (target n=1,000).The CARE 75+ study is funded by the NIHR CLAHRC YH programme, with Vicki Goodwin as local PI in the South West. Andy also led the authorship of a highly cited Lancet review on frailty in elderly people http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(12)62167-9/abstract

Please let Vicki Goodwin know if you plan to attend v.goodwin@exeter.ac.uk

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
2nd August 2017

9.30am-12.30pm

Health Statictics Group - Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Associate Professor Obi Ukoumunne - South Cloisters, St Luke’s
Email: O.C.Ukoumunne@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's
19th July 2017

Institute of Health Research

Health Economics Group

12.30-1.30pm Subjective wellbeing in economics and health policy

Professor Bernard van den Berg, Professor of Health Economics, University of Groningen

Conceptualizing and measuring subjective wellbeing has become part of mainstream economics over the last decade or so. Policy makers worldwide seem to encourage the refinement of measures of subjective wellbeing to measure national progress.

The UK Cabinet Office asked the Office for National Statistics in 2010 to measure wellbeing or quality of life. This posed challenges for health policy which heavily relies on the measurement of health-related quality of life. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance on public health for instance, mentions the possibility that wellbeing could complement existing measures of health-related quality of life. The NICE guidance on social care seems to suggest the possibility of going beyond health and to use wellbeing as the main outcome measure for cost-effectiveness analyses in a social care setting.

This presentation provides an introduction to the economic and health economic literature on subjective wellbeing. It uses case studies to illustrate the main empirical findings of the health economic literature. I also aim to explore and discuss how subjective wellbeing could potentially improve health policy.  

For further information please contact l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk
3.06 South Cloisters, St Luke’s
18th July 2017 1-4pm Health Statistics Group –
Stats Advice Clinics
Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following
sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment

Dr Fiona Warren
Email: F.C.Warren@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

Smeall Building, St Luke’s
18th July 2017 2-4pm

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store:
http://store.exeter.ac.uk/conferences-events/nihr-clahrc-south-west-peninsula
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 7 working days prior to the event.
1.27, South Cloisters, St Luke's
11th July 2017 12-1pm Cognitive Neurology Group Seminar Epileptic Activity in Alzheimer’s Disease: Causes and Clinical Relevance
Associate Professor Keith Vossel, University of Tennessee, Memphis

Dr. Keith Vossel is an Associate Professor of Neurology in the N. Bud Grossman Center for Memory Research and Care and Scholar in the Institute for Translational Neuroscience at the University of Minnesota. He holds a medical degree and a master’s in biomedical engineering, and completed his clinical fellowship in behavioral neurology at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center. In addition to caring for patients, Dr. Vossel investigates antiepileptic and tau-based treatments for brain network dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease, in mouse models and human studies. He leads a phase 2a clinical trial of an antiepileptic drug to treat silent seizures that occur in Alzheimer’s disease. In his talk, Dr. Vossel will be discussing mechanisms and treatment of epilepsy in Alzheimer’s disease, covering preclinical studies in transgenic mouse models, biomarkers of network hyperexcitability in humans, and a clinical treatment trial.

http://www.zoominfo.com/p/Keith-Vossel/2025951848

For further information please contact: Marilyn Evans (email Marilyn.evans@exeter.ac.uk)

G18, Medical School Building, St Luke's
4th July 2017  12-1.30pm  NIHR Strategy Group  The NIHR Strategy Group is holding a ‘Health Research ‘Pitch & Putt’ Hustings’ on Tuesday 4th July 12-1.30pm in St Luke’s Baring Court 112. This is an opportunity for those considering to submit grants in Health Research (NIHR primarily, but also other relevant funders in the applied Health Research area) in the next few months to pitch an early stage grant idea to a group of academics from the NIHR Strategy Group who will be able to provide you with early feedback on your proposal and provide guidance for developing it further.
 
The format for each of the sessions will be a 5-10 min presentation from yourself on your project which would typically be 3-4 slides followed by 10 mins feedback. The time slots will be strict (15-20 min in total) in order to fit everyone in. It would be great if you could come to the whole session (rather than just your own) in order to support and provide feedback to other colleagues presenting if possible.
 
If you are interested in pitching and idea, please can you let Charlotte Murphy (c.j.murphy@ex.ac.uk) know before the 28th June and we will put together a schedule accordingly.
 
112, Baring Court, St Luke's
27th June 2017 10am-12.30pm

Health Statistics Group –
Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following
sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment

Dr Lauren Rodgers
Email: L.R.Rodgers@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke’s 
22nd June 2017 12-1pm

PenCHORD Seminar

Physician scheduling in hospitals. From theory to practice using decision support tools
Professor Jens O. BrunnerUniversity of Augsburg, Germany

Abstract: In order to cope with steadily increasing healthcare costs, hospitals try to schedule their staff (e.g. physicians, nurses, logistics assistants, etc.) efficiently and effectively. We consider practical and theoretical physician scheduling problems at large teaching hospitals in Germany. In particular, we model the problem of duty-and workstation assignments and show appropriate methodologies to find solutions. The problems are constraint by union contracts as well as individual agreements between the hospital and the employees. To promote for job satisfaction, we take into account fairness and preference considerations. Regarding the practical side of physician scheduling, we present the status of the software development which is in use since 2015. Finally, we discuss lessons learned from the project and highlight some barriers when it comes to real implementation of decision support systems in practice.

Bio: Jens Brunner has been permanently appointed as Professor of Health Care Operations & Health Information Management at the Faculty of Business and Economics at the University of Augsburg (Germany) in March 2013.Since July 2016 he is co-director of the University Centerfor Health Care at KlinikumAugsburg (UNIKA-T). He received a PhD from the TUM School of Management in 2009 and a diploma degree in Business Administration from the University of Mannheim in 2006. His research interests centeron design and analysis of service systems using quantitative methods, a special focus is on processes in health care. He is Associate Editor for Operations Research for Health Care and has published in IIE Transaction, Health Care Management Science and European Journal of Operational Research.

This seminar is organised by PenCHORD – the Peninsula Collaboration for Health Operational Research and Development. Please contact s.rachuba@exeter.ac.uk should you have any queries.

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
19th June 2017 12.30-13.30pm

Seminar

Measuring and improving the quality of NHS care for children and young people: where do we go next?

Dr Dougal Hargreaves
Health Foundation Improvement Science Fellow, UCL Institute of Child Health

Dougal Hargreaves is an Honorary Consultant Paediatrician at University College London Hospital and a Health Foundation Improvement Science Fellow at the UCL Institute of Child Health. His main research interests are in defining, monitoring and improving the quality of healthcare for children and young people (CYP) (0-24 years). His current work encompasses projects investigating geographical variation in health outcomes, health inequalities, CYP and family perspectives on quality, new models of care delivery for CYP, and the link between care quality and health outcomes.

Since qualifying from Cambridge University in 1999, he has worked in a wide range of clinical roles, including international work in Turkmenistan, Pakistan and Bosnia. He holds a MD(Res) in Adolescent Health Services from University College London and also has postgraduate qualifications in public health and health economics. From 2009-11, he worked as a Clinical Advisor at the English Department of Health, leading a national project to develop national quality standards for adolescent care within the NHS.  More recently, he was awarded a Harkness Fellowship at Harvard Medical School, where he studied healthcare policies affecting adolescents and young adults.

If you would like to attend please contact stella.taylor@exeter.ac.uk
JS07, Smeall Building or G18 Medical School Building, St Luke’s
14th June 2017 12-1pm

APEx Seminar

Exploring the safety of an electronic prescribing system in an Intensive Care Unit: A mixed methods approach

Jaheeda Gangannagaripalli, Researcher, Health Services & Policy Research Group, University of Exeter Medical School

&

Optimising Interventional Treatment of Tennis Elbow

Jonathan Evans, MD Student, Health Services & Policy Research, UEMS & Orthopaedic Registrar

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke’s
14th June 2017 12-1.30pm (optional workshop 2-4pm)

IHR Seminar

Creative Communication: To blog or not to blog - is blogging right for me?

As part of the 'Creative Communication: seminar and workshop series’ André Tomlin (@Mental¬Elf), Caron Sprake (@CaronCares2) and Andrew McRae (@McRaeAndrew a head of department’s blog) will be talking about their blogs why they use them, their experiences in setting up and maintenance, and sharing some top tips for blogging and how to make the most of digital technology. So, if you want a clear and fun introduction to the importance of blogs and social media - this is the talk for you!

This seminar will be followed by a practical ‘how to’ workshop hosted by André Tomlin. Please make sure you indicate your interest in attending the workshop when you register for the seminar as there is a minimum number this workshop will run for.

André Tomlin is an Information Scientist with 20 years’ experience working in evidence-based healthcare. He has worked in the NHS and for the University of Oxford where he helped to set up the Centre for Evidence Based Mental Health. In 2002, he spun out a company from Oxford University (www.minervation.com), and he has spent the last 15 years building health websites for charities and the public sector. Most recently he has been the driving force behind the Mental Elf blog, which is part of a series of health evidence blogs designed to help health and social care professionals keep up to date with simple, clear and engaging summaries of evidence-based research.

Caron Sprake is passionate about good care for the elderly and campaigns to raise    awareness about issues affecting them and their caregivers. From technophobe to award-winning blogger (UK Blog Awards 2016 in the category, Health and Social Care), Caron has used her blog, "Caron Cares" offering advice and information to anyone caring for someone elderly or with dementia, to help people across the world. Caron Cares is a cross between Age UK and Which with a person behind it who genuinely cares and is there to really help you. Caron is a regular columnist for Devon Life and writes for Huffington Post.

Andrew McRae is the Head of English at Exeter University and the author of ‘A Head of   Department’s Blog’. He is a self-taught blogger, who uses this medium as a way of engaging with higher education policy and practice, particularly from the perspective of an academic department. He writes as an academic researcher, teacher and manager, often just trying to make sense of policy changes. In 2017 he has shared some posts with wonkhe.com.

For further information on this or other seminars in this series click here: http://clahrc-peninsula.nihr.ac.uk/creative-communication-seminar-series or contact r.s.whear@exeter.ac.ukTo register click here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/creative-communication-to-blog-or-not-to-blog-is-blogging-right-for-me-tickets-33455455167?aff=es2.

2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's

(Video link to Truro Knowledge Spa F10 and Plymouth John Bull Building PSq C501)

7th June 2017 10am-12pm 

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

 
UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store:
http://store.exeter.ac.uk/conferences-events/nihr-clahrc-south-west-peninsula
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 7 working days prior to the event.
1.27, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
7th June 2017  10.30am-12.30pm  Exeter Clinical Trials Support Network Event 13 Are you involved in Clinical Trials?
If yes! the following network event has been organised for you:
Exeter Clinical Trials Support Network Event 13
 
Programme:
10:30    Refreshments: Coffee &Cake
10:40    Introduction (5mins)
            Shelley Rhodes - ExeCTU Senior Trial Manager
            Anthony Asindi - ExeCTU Quality and Contracts Manager
10:45    Clinical trial  Data Programming & Management.
            What can ExeCTU do for you? (30mins)
            ExeCTU Data Programming Team:
            Tim Eames, Mary Davis & Sofia Sanabria
11:15    Q&A followed by networking (30mins)
11:45    Data Archiving & Open Access Case Study – The COBRA trial (15mins)
            Shelley Rhodes – ExeCTU Senior Trial Manager
            (formerly COBRA Trial Manager)
12:oo    Q&A followed by networking
12:30    End

Please RSVP to the CTSN Mailbox: ctsn@exeter.ac.uk
 

Exeter Medical School S09, St Lukes

This is on the top-floor so please let us know if you would like assistance with access.

 
5th June 2017

1-2pm

Institute of Health Research

Qualitative Research Support Group Seminar

Insights from the everyday practice of ethnography in emergency care

Professor Catherine Pope
Professor of Medical Sociology in the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton

This paper will draw together my thoughts about the practicalities of doing ethnography in emergency care and trauma care settings in the NHS. I plan to talk about three studies. First I will describe my experiences studying ambulance handover communication in a project which included observations of over 200 ambulance journeys and interviews with crew, hospital staff and patients. Then I will describe a recently completed project that used observation to evaluate the implementation of an innovative checklist for ‘minors’ (ambulatory) patients attending the Emergency Department. Finally, I will look at my new role as researcher-in-residence in the Regional Trauma Centre. In describing these projects I want to untangle some knotty issues about doing research in healthcare settings and, in particular, to contrast the idealised versions of methodology and research ethics with the rather messier and complicated realities of everyday ethnographic conduct.

Catherine Pope is Professor of Medical Sociology in the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton where she leads Emergency and Urgent Care (EmU) research and is a member of the NIHR CLAHRC Wessex. Her research focuses on healthcare work and the organisation and delivery of health services. She has a researcher-in-residence role in the Wessex Regional Trauma Centre. Catherine has played a leading role in developing qualitative methods and evidence synthesis in
health services research and contributes to undergraduate and postgraduate education across health and social sciences and for the Web Science Centre for Doctoral Training.

For further information please contact linda.dumchen@exeter.ac.uk

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
1st June 2017

12pm-1pm

Institute of Health Research

Centre for Research in Aging & Cognitive Health (REACH) Seminar

Examining the experience of caring for a family member with dementia through illness blogs

Associate Professor Joel Anderson
University of Tennessee

Individuals who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias often exhibit behavioral and psychological symptoms that can place a great deal of strain on family carers. This strain leads to increased stress for family carers and reduced quality of life. While the impact of dementia caregiving on levels of depression, anxiety, and stress has been explored, more information is needed on the psychosocial impact of dementia caregiving on carers and families. Many individuals use web blogs as online journals to share their lived experiences. These blogs contain rich narratives that represent an untapped resource for understanding the psychosocial impact of caring for a person with dementia at the individual and family level. The present study uses blogs to explore the psychosocial impact of dementia caregiving, examining how and why carers use blogs as part of the caregiving experience, strategies used for supporting themselves and their loved ones, and the impact of dementia on the dignity of persons living with the disease. By understanding the psychosocial impacts of dementia caregiving, family focused interventions and services can be developed to reduce caregiver strain and improve quality of life.

For further information please contact s.odwyer@exeter.ac.uk

BC112, Baring Court, St Luke’s

31st May 2017

9.45am-1.30pm

Health Economics Workshop

Introduction to health economics workshop

In this one day workshop, participants will be introduced to key principles and concepts of health economics and economic evaluation.

Intended for those unfamiliar with the health economics field, the workshop will provide a critical perspective on a pragmatic analytical framework for understanding economic evaluation studies.

The workshop will cover topics such as:
(1) health state preference valuation and how to estimate Quality Adjusted Life years (QAYLs).
(2)the methodology for identifying, measuring and valuing resources consumed by users of health care interventions and services.

Finally, participants will be given the necessary tools to critically appraise economic evaluation research papers.

9.45am Arrival refreshments
10am Start
1.30pm Finish

TO BOOK FOLLOW THIS LINK -

http://clahrc-peninsula.nihr.ac.uk/event/health-economics-workshop-with-antonieta-medina-lara

Baring Court 202, St Luke's

26th May 2017

Seminar: 1.30 to 2.30, Room G18

Workshop: 2.45 to 4.15, Room G27

Seminar & Workshop

Dealing with complex reviews: how to do narrative synthesis well

Audience: The seminar is intended for anyone interested in systematic review methods. The workshop is intended for those specifically working with quantitative systematic reviews, wanting to develop skills in narrative synthesis.
Note: If you are interested in attending the workshop, please email Michael Nunns to register your interest (M.p.nunns@exeter.ac.uk).

Content: Systematic reviewers often encounter complex and heterogeneous samples of studies which may not be amenable to meta-analysis. Where data cannot be meta-analysed, the data may be synthesised narratively, but this is often poorly reported. The seminar will provide an insight into the importance of narrative synthesis, the key components of good practice, and useful tools to improve transparency. Workshop attendees will be provided with extracted and tabulated data from a published Cochrane review of a public health intervention, and will work in small groups towards a brief narrative synthesis.

Presenter: We are delighted to welcome international expert Dr Hilary Thomson to present these sessions. Hilary leads the evidence synthesis theme (Improving the quality and utility of evidence synthesis) within the Informing Healthy Public Policy programme at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit at the University of Glasgow. Hilary has
extensive experience in conducting large complex reviews of questions about the health impacts of social policy interventions such as housing, transport, and welfare. This includes work to improve the transparency of non-statistical methods of synthesis, interpretation of complex reviews and assessing Risk of Bias in Non-Randomised Studies. In addition to a range of systematic reviews, Hilary is a Co-I on the NIHR funded Complex Reviews Support Unit and is co-ordinating editor of Cochrane Public Health.

For more details, search for the events on MyCareerZone, or click here:
https://mycareerzone.exeter.ac.uk/students/events/detail/476208/dealing-with-complexreviews-h

Seminar: 1.30 to 2.30, Room G18

Workshop: 2.45 to 4.15, Room G27

25th May 2017 12-1pm Institute of Health Research Seminar

Professor Wendy Brown
University of Queensland

Physical activity in mid-age and older women: Lessons from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH) commenced in 1996 when researchers recruited approximately 40,000 women in three birth cohorts, 1973-1978, 1946-1951 and 1921-1926. Since then participants have completed surveys on a wide range of health issues, at approximately three year intervals. This presentation will describe changes in physical activity (PA) over time in the mid-age and older ALSWH cohorts, and summarize the findings of studies from the ALSWH on the determinants of PA, and its associated health outcomes in Australian women. The data show a significant increase in physical activity during mid-age, and a rapid decline in activity levels when women are in their 80s. The study has demonstrated the importance of life-stages and key life events as determinants of activity, the additional benefits of vigorous activity for mid-age women, and the health benefits of ‘only walking’ for older women. The data indicate that maintaining a high level of physical activity throughout mid and older age will not only reduce the risk of premature death, but also significantly extend the number of years of healthy life.

For further information please contact s.odwyer@exeter.ac.uk

Parking at St Luke’s is extremely limited and restricted to University of Exeter permit holders. Parking attendants patrol regularly. Where possible, please consider alternative options when planning your visit.

BC217, Baring Court, St Luke's Campus

24th May 2017 1-2pm APEx Seminar

Calling time on the consultation
Professor John Campbell, Professor of General Practice & Primary Care, Director of APEx, University of Exeter Medical School

There is currently not enough evidence to say whether altering the amount of time that doctors consult with patients provides benefits or not. We consider the findings of four recent research papers exploring the impact of variation in consultation length.

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke’s

(with video conferencing to F083, Knowledge Spa)

23rd May 2017 10am-1pm  Health Statistics Group - Stats Advice Clinics 

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment

Professor William Henley: W.E.Henley@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice. 

South Cloisters, St Luke's
22nd May 2017 10.30am-2.15pm Early Career Researcher Network Event

Event open to Postgraduate Researchers, Early Career Researchers (E, F and new G grades) and Professional Services Staff from the Institute of Health Research

A Chance to Meet Other Early Career Researchers and Tell Us What you Want From the Early Career Researcher Network

Talks held 11.15-12.30
Speakers include: Professors Stuart Logan, Angela Shore and Michelle Ryan.

Topics for discussion:

  • What can the peer network offer me?
  • Where can Early Career Researchers access support?
  • What should Early Career Researchers expect from their line managers?
  • How did the speakers navigate their own early research careers?

Bring and Share Lunch
Transport provided for people from Penryn and Plymouth Campuses

For more information please contact Liz Shaw: E.H.Shaw@Exeter.ac.uk

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
17th May 2017 2-3.30pm Wellcome Trust Centre Roadshows

Wellcome Centre of Cultures and Environments of Health (University of Exeter)

Combining expertise from humanities and social sciences, together with natural, medical and environmental sciences, the vision of the Wellcome Trust Centre of Cultures and Environments of Health is to provide a unique opportunity to work together to address health challenges facing socially and culturally diverse populations.

The Centre aims to:

  • Determine how individual and collective health and well-being are shaped by cultural contexts, environmental conditions and social relations;
  • Extend the evidence base for cross-sectoral policies and interventions that help to create and sustain ‘healthy publics’.

The Centre’s ethos is that:

  • Effective responses to complex health issues require approaches that mobilise non-linear models of health and well-being, recognise the importance of subjective and collective experience, and synthesise approaches and insights from the humanities and social sciences with those from life sciences and medicine.

Our ambition is to establish a Centre in which creative pathways of investigation, interpretation and action can be communicated and shared across disciplines in order to generate and sustain healthy cultures and environments.
The roadshow will provide an opportunity to:

  • Meet members of the Centre’s senior research team and hear about their plans for research
  • To learn more about the Centre’s timetable for recruitment
  • Funding opportunities for research and public engagement activities

Refreshments served on arrival

14.00 - Open session: Welcome and introduction (Refreshments served on arrival)
            Led by senior research team
14.45 - Q&A session with members of the senior research team    
15.30 - End of session  

Please register your interest in attending using the online registration form.
If you have any questions about the event please contact research-events@exeter.ac.uk

EMS G18, St Luke’s
10th May 2017 10.00am-1.30pm Seminar

Introduction to Qualitative Research Evidence with Associate Professor Dr Sarah Dean

During this talk Sarah Dean will introduce the basic principles of qualitative research and how it differs from quantitative research. Using entertaining practical examples participants engage in learning about the meaning of experience and how this is important for understanding health problems.

To book, please visit http://clahrc-peninsula.nihr.ac.uk/event/introduction-to-qualitative-research-evidence

Medical School Building, St Luke's
3rd May 2017 10am-12pm Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/

1.27, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
26th April 2017  1-2pm  APEx Seminar 

Dementia: Prevention, Treatment and Care

Professor Clive Ballard
Pro Vice Chancellor and Executive Dean, University of Exeter Medical School, Epidemiology, UEMS

The presentation will review the up-to-date evidence from clinical trials focussing on prevention, symptomatic treatment and disease modification of Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions. Emerging findings from our own studies will also be presented, including studies examining the maintenance of cognitive function, our on-line PROTECT platform, work focussing on the treatment of agitation, psychosis and pain in people with dementia and new work examining human grade stem cell therapies.

Email : j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk  to book your place.
For further information visit: www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/apex/seminars
NC12 North Cloisters, St Luke's 
24th April 2017  9.30am-12.30pm  Health Statistics Group - Stats Advice Clinics 

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or
arrange an appointment

Dr Gary Abel: G.A.Abel@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

Smeall Building, St Luke's 
24th April 2017 12-1pm

Institute of Health Research

A joint seminar hosted by the Complex Interventions &
Cardiac Rehabilitation Research Groups

Issues to consider when moving from development to pilot testing in complex interventions: an example of a nurse-led clinic for individuals with Heart Failure in Switzerland

Dr Petra Schafer-Keller, Nurse Researcher; Lecturer,
University of Applied Sciences and Arts
Western Switzerland – School of Health Sciences

For research into complex interventions, when to move from the development and modelling phases to testing and evaluation is a matter of uncertain judgement. Schafer-Keller and colleagues have a programme to develop, test, evaluate and ultimately implement a nurse-led clinic for individuals with heart failure in Switzerland. They will outline the mix of qualitative and quantitative methods, and the results of their intervention development stage aimed at uncovering both healthcare professionals’ perceived challenges in delivering heart failure care, and the needs and existing self-care abilities of individuals with heart failure. As this phase comes to an end, they will discuss how to translate such findings into an evidence-informed complex intervention ready for the next stage of pilot testing.

In this seminar, Petra will present the preliminary modelling of this complex intervention using a six stage intervention mapping process and will discuss selected stages in detail. Audience participation will be encouraged during the seminar in order to consider incorporating elements evolving from seminar discussions into the modelling process.

ALL STAFF AND STUDENTS ARE WELCOME
Enquiries to Lucy Evans (L.Evans@exeter.ac.uk)

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
19th April 2017 1-3pm Creative Communication: seminar and workshop series

Creative Communication: Making Research Visible, Accessible and Engaging

As part of the 'Creative Communication: seminar and workshop series’ Sarah Chapman and Jack Leahy will be talking about their work, which focuses on creative dissemination of Cochrane reviews and other health evidence through social media. As well as giving an overview of their dissemination work, they will show how the findings of one Cochrane review were shared in multiple formats and the impact of these activities. Through a series of brief activities, you will have a chance to start building a communication plan for your own research.

Sarah Chapman is the Knowledge Broker at Cochrane UK where her work focuses on creative dissemination of Cochrane reviews and other health evidence through social media, including writing and editing the Evidently  Cochrane blog. She has a keen interest in exploring ways to share health evidence widely and encourage engagement with it.

Jack Leahy is the Communications and Engagement Officer for  Cochrane UK. He is responsible for managing the digital presence of Cochrane UK, measuring impact, and the development of new evidence products. He graduated from the University of Bristol with an MSci in  Chemistry in 2014. He then worked in drug policy reform before joining Cochrane UK in early 2016. He is interested in the ways in which research can be disseminated to effect change from practice through to policy.

Look here http://clahrc-peninsula.nihr.ac.uk/creative-communication-seminar-series for further information on this or other seminars in this series or contact r.s.whear@exeter.ac.uk.

To register click here

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
30th March 2017 2-5pm Health Statistics Group - Stats Advice Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Justin Matthews: J.N.Matthews@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's
15th March 2017  1-2pm  University of Exeter Collaboration for Academic Primary Care (APEx)  Continuity – is it the key to care?
Continuity of care is much talked about in general practice but increasingly hard to provide. So how important is it? Who benefits from it? And how?

Associate Professor Philip Evans, Dr Kate Sidaway-Lee, Sir Denis Pereira Gray, St Leonard’s Practice, Exeter

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/ 

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke’s 
15th March 2017 12.30-1.30pm Seminar

*****Cancelled*****

Learning and surviving: an outsider looking in at the working lives of doctors

Professor Jeremy Brown, Postgraduate Medical Institute, Edge Hill University

Medicine is a career that requires doctors to continually reflect, learn and develop throughout their working life. Jeremy will address some of the ongoing challenges faced by doctors at each stage of their professional career, from newly qualified to hospital consultant or GP. This seminar will consider the multiple roles of doctors as clinicians, learners, educators and leaders.  In doing so Jeremy will reflect on the current state of medical education research as an academic discipline and consider where our research priorities should lie in relation to undergraduate / postgraduate education and patient care.

1.21, South Cloisters, St Luke's
8th March 2017 1-2pm Institute of Health Research Seminar

Cognitive function assessment in clinical research: The good, the bad & the ugly

Professor Keith Andrew Wesnes
BSc PhD FSS CPsychol FBPsS

Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Exeter Medical School

Keith joined UEMS as Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience in November 2016. Since 1973 he has specialized in measuring human cognitive function in clinical trials. His PhD at Reading University into the cholinergic bases of human attention led him to computerize tests of major aspects of cognition, and in the early 1980s to develop the CDR System, an integrated set of computerized tests to assess change in cognitive function in clinical trials. Since 1986 the System has been used in over 1,400 worldwide clinical trials. He holds Professorships at the Psychology Department, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne (since 1997), the Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia (since 2007) and the Medicinal Plant Research Group, University of Newcastle (since 2015). Previous academic positions have been held at Indiana University, Reading University, Guy’s Hospital Medical School, the University of East London and Bristol University. He has authored approaching 300 peer-reviewed publications and 9 students have received PhDs under his supervision. Since February 2014 he has run Wesnes Cognition Ltd, which provides a proprietary online cognitive test system, CogTrack, for use in worldwide clinical research.

The presentation will be an overview of Keith’s research in applying cognitive tests to clinical research. Collaboration with Universities & research groups worldwide has been a core feature of his experience and he will present an overview of studies in a wide variety of disciplines. The benefits of automated testing will be discussed. The intention is to make colleagues in UEMS aware of the cognitive test system Keith has developed, as he hopes to provide it to groups who may wish to use it on projects of mutual interest.

For further information please contact linda.dumchen@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's 
7th March 2017 12-1pm

Insitiute of Health Research

Health Economics Group and PenTAG
Seminar

 

Modelling of pharmaceuticals licensed without RCT data

Anthony Hatswell – Principal Consultant (HTA Methodology), BresMed Health Solutions LTD

Pharmaceuticals are most commonly licensed in randomised controlled trials against placebo or active comparators. On occasion however, drugs are approved without a comparative trial being available. This talk will discuss the circumstances and ethics around such approvals, and present work on the number of treatments licensed over the past 15 years under such circumstances, and how their comparative efficacy has been modelled. Following this, there will be a discussion of other techniques that can be used and ongoing work to estimate efficacy based on historical controls and other methods, including propensity scoring, matching adjusted indirect comparisons, and novel techniques.

Anthony Hatswell is a Principal Consultant at BresMed where he works as a health economist on NICE submissions, evidence generation, and quality of life analysis. His PhD is part time as a mature student on the estimation of comparative effectiveness from uncontrolled clinical studies. Prior to BresMed, he graduated from the University of York, before holding roles at and sanofi-aventis and GSK UK.

For further information, please contact Huiqin Yang H.Yang@exeter.ac.uk

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
6th March 2017 Qualitative Research Advice Clinic 2-4pm

For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/

1.47, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
2nd March 2017 11.30am-12.30pm  

Institute of Health Research

Health Economics Group, PenTAG and Knowledge Mobilisation

Health economics in local government settings: a focus on childhood obesity

Dr Emma Frew
Reader in Health Economics, NIHR Career-Development Fellow, University of Birmingham

In April 2013, responsibility for public health in England moved away from the National Health Service to local authorities (LAs). Financial support was provided through ring-fenced public health budgets for LAs to work with providers of health and non-health services, as well as community organisations to improve population health and wellbeing (HM Government, 2012c). More recently however, budgets have been cut, in 2015/6 the LA public health budget was cut by 7% (£200 million), and it has to be further cut by 3.9% annually over the next five years – amounting to a long term reduction in real-terms of £600 million by 2020/21. Alongside these cuts, in October 2015, the Government announced that by the end of Parliament, LA’s will be able to keep 100% of business rates they raise locally and the public health budget will be no longer ring-fenced. Moving public health into LAs has provided opportunity to integrate public health with other LA functions such as education, planning, housing, crime to improve population health and wellbeing. Together with the rapidly changing financial context, there has also been a move towards ‘place-based’ activities, aligning providers of care to achieve common objectives that are about meeting the needs of local populations.

One key public health priority it to tackle the alarming levels of childhood obesity. Children who are overweight have an increased risk of disease, have lower quality of life and an increased risk of adult obesity causing a huge societal burden over the life course. This seminar will focus on how health economics can contribute to childhood obesity interventions within a LA setting. Consideration will be given to the organizational, political, and financial context, and the need for LA’s to align priorities to improve population health and wellbeing, whilst reducing inequalities. It will discuss how the ‘traditional’ methods of economic evaluation fit within that context and provide insight into how the economist can contribute to decision making within this setting. It will use case-studies from Birmingham LA to present novel, innovative ways of changing the obesogenic environment and discuss how economics can be used to evaluate these approaches.

For further information please contact l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Lukes
22nd February 2017 1-2pm  APEx Seminar 

The Community-based Prevention of Diabetes (ComPoD) randomised, waiting list controlled trial of a voluntary sector-led diabetes prevention programme

Associate Professor Colin Greaves and Dr Jane Smith

This talk will present the findings of the School for Public Health Research’s Community-based Prevention of Diabetes study (ComPoD) www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN70221670. This is a randomised waiting list controlled trial of a voluntary sector-led intervention to reduce risk of progression to type 2 diabetes in an at-risk adult population. The primary outcome was weight loss at 6 months post-randomisation, but changes in HbA1c, physical activity and other risk indicators were also measured. Maintenance of the changes achieved was estimated at 12 months.

Join us afterwards for our informal monthly APEx meeting: updates on progress in APEx and networking (refreshments will be served). Email: j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk to book your place. For further information visit: www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/apex/seminars

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
21st February 2017  11am-1pm  Health Statistics Group –
Spring Term Stats Clinics 

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries. Please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Dr Lauren Rodgers L.R.Rodgers@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's
17th February 2017 11.50am-12.30pm

Seminar

Future Strategy for Research in the NHS

Professor Chris Whitty
Chief Scientific Adviser for the Department of Health

Professor Chris Whitty was appointed Chief Scientific Adviser for the Department of Health in January 2016. He has overall responsibility for the DH research and development budget which includes the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR). He leads DH research policy and supporting evidenced based decision making capacity.

Professor Whitty is currently the Professor of Public and International Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and a Consultant Physician in acute medicine and infectious diseases at University College London Hospitals and the Hospital for Tropical Diseases. He is also Visiting Gresham Professor of Public Health at Gresham College.

Professor Whitty will talk about his vision for Health Research, the challenges and opportunities.

RILD, PMS Lecture Theatre, Barrack Road (RD&E)
1st February 2017  10am-12pm

Open session

Research and Impact Strategy

In February three open sessions providing an update on the Research and Impact Strategy will take place, with Professor Nick Talbot (Deputy Vice-Chancellor for Research and Impact) and colleagues leading on strands of the strategy.

Sessions will take place on St Luke's, Streatham, and Penryn Campus. For more information on the Research and Impact Strategy, please click here.

In these sessions you will be able to:

  • Hear about the latest developments in the University's Research and Impact Strategy.
  • Find out more about the key strategic areas, who is leading on them, and how they will impact the research community.
  • Ask questions to Professor Nick Talbot and key staff.
We would be grateful if people could register to ensure we have enough space for everyone. We intend to make a recording available of at least one session.

For more information please contact research-events@exeter.ac.uk

Streatham:
Wednesday 1 February, 13.30 - 15.00
Forum Alumni Auditorium

Penryn:
Thursday 9 February, 14.30 - 16.00
Peter Lanyon LT5

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
30th January 2017 2-3pm

Insitute of Health Research Seminar

Pharmacists: the magic bullet for the NHS?

Professor Margaret Watson
Professor of Health Services Research in the Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology at the University of Bath

I joined the University of Bath in October 2016 and I lead the Health and Clinical Research theme in the Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology. I registered as a pharmacist in 1987 and worked as a clinical pharmacist for eight years in various hospitals throughout the UK and more recently spent three years in pharmaceutical public health. I moved into health services research in the 1990s and was awarded my PhD (1998) from the Faculty of Medicine, University of Bristol. Along the way, I was awarded an MSc Epidemiology (2003) and Certificate in Pharmacovigilance and Pharmacoepidemiology (2001) from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine as well as an MSc Clinical Pharmacy from the University of Strathclyde (1989).

Much of my academic career has been supported by Fellowships from the Medical Research Council, Leverhulme Foundation and South West Regional Health Authority. My current Health Foundation Improvement Science Fellowship is a senior post-doctoral Fellowship which includes a unique leadership development programme. My wider academic roles have included membership
of the Scottish Government’s Chief Scientist Office Health Improvement, Protection and Services Research Committee and the International Journal of Pharmacy Practice editorial board. I chaired the International Social Pharmacy Workshop (2016), Health Services Research and Pharmacy Practice Conference (2014) and Royal Pharmaceutical Conference (2012).

Research Interests
The overall purpose of my research is to optimise patient outcome through the safe and effective use of medicines and evidence based professional practice.

My research is collaborative and multi-disciplinary and draws on different theoretical approaches and methods including: systematic literature reviews to synthesise existing evidence; qualitative methods that are theoretically-underpinned, to explore the behaviour of service users (patients/consumers) or providers (pharmacists, pharmacy personnel, other health care
professionals) to identify key determinants of specific behaviours; and quantitative methods (randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, questionnaires) to develop and test the effect of interventions to achieve behaviour change i.e. evidence based practice, quality improvement in health service delivery and patient outcomes.

For further information and if you would like to attend please contact linda.dumchen@exeter.ac.uk

2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
24th January 2017 12-1.30pm

LKD Seminar

National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) seminar

Implementation Science 2.0 – Show me the evidence!
Bianca Albers – Australian Centre for Evidence & Implementation

The field of implementation science has undergone an impressive growth in the past two decades. A large number of frameworks, models and concepts have emerged, all aiming to support researchers, organisational leaders, practitioners and other human service professionals in building, integrating and utilising evidence in their daily work – for the benefit of the target populations they serve. This presentation takes the temperature on the current status quo within implementation science: Where are we in building the evidence base for the field? What are common agreements, where are the gaps, and what needs to be done in the decade ahead?

Bianca Albers is a Senior Advisor, Evidence in Practice and Policy, at the Australian Centre for Evidence and Implementation (CEI). Her work focuses on knowledge synthesis and translation; the implementation and evaluation of evidence-informed programs, practices and service models; and on building the capacity within organisations and services to implement and sustain evidence-informed practices and policies. She is a staff member at the University of Melbourne’s Department of Social Work, where she developed and now teaches the first Post-Graduate Certificate in Implementation Science in the Australasian region. Ms Albers has a strong involvement with the international world of implementation science. She has co-chaired the first three Global Implementation Conferences held in 2011, 2013 and 2015, is one of the co-founders of the Danish Implementation Network and currently chairs the European Implementation Collaborative (EIC) and the planning of the third Nordic Implementation Conference to be held in Denmark in 2018. In 2015, Ms Albers was the lead editor of the book ‘Implementering’, which introduces implementation science to the area of child and youth services in Denmark and includes key contributions from Dr. Alison Metz (NIRN) and professor Per Nilsen, Linköping University, Sweden.

To Book – https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/SSYMJCB
LKD Blog: http://learningknowingdoing.org.uk

Presentations from previous seminars are available here:
http://clahrc-peninsula.nihr.ac.uk/implementation-science-seminar-archive

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's
19th January 2017  12pm Institute of Health Research Seminar

Age UK’s Index of Wellbeing in Later Life

Professor James Goodwin, Chief Scientist, Age UK
Professor Jose Iparraguirre, Chief Economist, Age UK

We will present the theoretical and practical background underlying Age UK’s interest in the well-being of older people. We shall then describe the research processes and findings of a project carried out at Age UK which produced the first composite index of wellbeing in later life for the UK. Based upon a framework informed by the academic literature and a deliberative qualitative exercise with older people, we applied a number of statistical techniques (factor analysis, structural equation modelling, and principal component analysis) on data from the Understanding Society survey to estimate individual wellbeing scores out of over 130 different indicators. Finally, the application and usefulness of our research outcome will be described.

Age UK Research

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's 

Past Events 2016

Date  TimeTitleDescriptionLocation
7th December 2016 1-2pm Institute of Health Research Seminar

Coronial practice and suicide rates: Beyond reasonable doubt?

Professor Belinda Carpenter
Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia

In response to widespread concerns about the accuracy of suicide statistics, this presentation will focus on the standard of proof used in coroners’ investigations of death by suicide. We present recent research into the ways in which coroners reach their verdicts, based on in-depth interviews with over 40 coroners, both in Australia and England. The results reveal a high degree of inconsistency within the various processes of suicide determination. They touch on issues of capacity and intent, different cultural understandings of suicide, and practical and philosophical difficulties with the construction of this category of death itself. We suggest that, among other issues, the necessary standard of proof and the wide range of ways in which it is interpreted—mostly very conservative—has a significant role to play in the ongoing coronial-authored underestimation of suicide.


Professor Carpenter has been conducting research into coroners’ decision making processes for more than 10 years and has written extensively on the subject, focusing also on the coroner’s role vis-à-vis the grieving family and the concept of therapeutic jurisprudence. Her other research interests include sex trafficking and prostitution.

For further information please contact Dr Christabel Owens c.v.owens@exeter.ac.uk

112, Baring Court, St Luke's Campus
6th December 2016 10am-1pm Health Statistics Group –
Spring Term Stats Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries. Please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Dr Beverley Shields, RILD Building b.shields@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.
RILD Building, RD&E Wonford
1st December 2016 12-1pm Learning, Knowing, Doing seminar series New technologies for patient safety: unpacking the black box of implementation challenges and opportunities

Dr Nicola Mackintosh - Kings College London

New technologies offer significant novelty and visibility, as well as the transformational potential to impact on service delivery, patient outcome and experience. However, ‘the promise’ of these often fails to deliver in practice due to a number of implementation challenges. In this seminar I will draw on ethnographic data from two studies (a critical care telemedicine model and an electronic early warning system) to demonstrate the complex constellations of political, organisational and professional factors which shape the adoption and implementation of safety technologies. Implementation themes such as distinguishing project drift from innovation, and capturing ‘normalisation work’ and process evaluation / implementation measures will be discussed.  Underpinning socio-cultural influences such as the contested nature of evidence, and representations of clinical work and ‘care’ will also be explored to highlight the opportunities and tensions presented by implementation of new technologies.  

Booking: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/D6BRDSK
LKD Blog: http://learningknowingdoing.org.uk
3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's. VC to Plymouth, room TBC
30th November 2016  1-3.30pm (12.30pm for lunch) APEx Workshop  Handling patient survey data in healthcare – massaging the data or sound practice?

Session presentations from Marc Elliott, Senior Principal Researcher, RAND and Gary Abel, UEMS Senior Lecturer

Please let Joy Choules know if you would like to attend just the workshop or the workshop with lunch. 
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's 
29th November 2016 1-2pm  Qualitative Research Advice Clinic  For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 7 working days prior to the event. 
2.35 and 1.27 South Cloisters, St Luke's 
21st November 2016 1pm (tea and coffee from 12.30pm) Joint Institute of Health Research & Cardiovascular Health Research Group Seminar

Diabetes and Heart failure: Can I help Sweet heart?

Professor Chim Lang, Consultant Cardiologist. Clinical Pharmacologist & Professor of Cardiology, University of Dundee

Chronic heart failure (CHF) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) frequently coexist and is associated with a poor outcome: T2D has consistently been shown to be an independent predictor of increased mortality in patients with either symptomatic heart failure or asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction.   It is difficult to outline an evidence-based diabetic treatment strategy in these patients because there have been no randomized trials that have adequately explored the risks and benefits of diabetic therapies in this at-risk population. This situation is not helped by the increased heart failure risk of some T2D therapies (glitazones) and this CHF concern has resulted in the exclusion of CHF patients in most of the large-scale cardiovascular safety trials of T2D therapies mandated by the FDA. Yet, there is still a critical need for agents that will both improve overall glycaemic control and CHF outcomes. In this seminar, I will explore potential therapeutic options for this unmet need suggested by observational data that needs to be addressed by translational ‘proof of concept’ and outcome clinical trials

All staff and students are welcome

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's

Meeting video linked to Rm F083 Knowledge Spa, Truro

 
14th November 2016 12-1pm Health Economics Group and PenTAG Seminar

Professor Andrea Manca
Professor of Health Economics at the University of York

On cost effectiveness analysis and person-centred healthcare

Person-centred healthcare (more often referred to as personalised or precision medicine) is becoming one of the hottest topics on the public and private agenda worldwide. It has supporters among the industry, patients organisations, healthcare professionals, academics, funders and politicians. Devoting energies and resources to pursue (and hopefully realise) the promises of person-centred healthcare would seem to be a win-win strategy for a number of stakeholders. Indeed, recent years have seen an acceleration in R&D reports towards the development of novel person-centred diagnostics, drugs and medical devices (both therapeutic and support). But here lies the critical issue: how can Society shape the future of healthcare, identify and prioritise R&D investments towards acceptable, cost-effective and sustainable person-centred interventions with the highest return in terms of population health and other relevant outcomes? Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) for Health Technology Assessment (HTA) plays a pivotal role in informing such decisions in many jurisdictions around the world. However, the design and analysis of CEAs has traditionally followed the standards of mainstream clinical epidemiology and evaluation studies, reporting results based on sample means, which are expected to represent the average patient. This view of the world has been recently challenged by the need to (a) recognize individuals' heterogeneity in factors that may systematically affect costs and health outcomes, (b) reflect these characteristics in the design and analysis of CEA studies, and (c) inform more nuanced (clinical and health policy) decisions regarding funding treatments provision and further research effort priorities.

This talk discusses these and a number of other issues that the current evaluative framework for healthcare decision making needs to overcome, if it is to survive the demands posed by the personcentred healthcare (r)evolution, presenting recent methodological advances that may help our pursuit of it.

For further information please contact l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Lukes 
9th November 2016 1-2pm APEx Seminar

Diagnostic activity indicators for cancer in primary care.

Dr Gary Abel, Senior Lecturer, University of Exeter Medical School

Please contact Joy Choules for further information j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's 
8th November 2016 1-4pm Stats Advice Clinic

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Sue Ball
Email: S.Ball3@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Advice Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's
7th November 2016 12.30-1.30pm Learning, Knowing, Doing seminar series

The art and science of non-evaluation evaluation
Lorelei Jones and Justin Waring

Speaker - Lorelei Jones – Biography
My research looks at the changing social organisation of health care services and professional work in the context of contemporary policy reforms. I studied anthropology and sociology as an undergraduate, and wrote my masters thesis on changes in the professional identity of general practitioners.  For my doctoral research I studied ethnographically the politically contested issue of hospital planning.  I am currently interested in the role of expertise in governing, using policies for ‘self care’, ‘major system change’ and the practices of policy evaluation as particular cases. I am a member of the editorial board for Sociology of Health and Illness and co-convenor of the London Medical Sociology Group where we explore the links between social theory, philosophy and medical sociology.

Seminar details – There is growing recognition of the limitations of realist evaluation, and other theory driven approaches to evaluation, in the context of healthcare policies. These approaches, which seek to surface ‘programme theories’ or construct ‘logic models’, are often unable to account for empirical observations of policy implementation in real-life situations.  In this paper we argue that this failure stems from insufficient theoretical elaboration of the social, cultural, and political dimensions of healthcare policies. Drawing from institutional theory, critical theory and discourse theory, and from organizational ethnography, we set out an alternative approach to research on healthcare reform. We illustrate with examples from our own experience of research on acute care ‘reconfiguration’, integrated health and social care and other forms of major system change in the NHS in England.

Please register at: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/9QBQNJ9
LKD Blog: http://learningknowingdoing.org.uk

3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's (VC to Plymouth)
2nd November 2016 10-11.30am APEx Seminar

Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROs) in Clinical Trials – an introduction

Dr Tove A Hanssen, Honorary Research Fellow, University of Exeter Medical School

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
25th October 2016 10am-12pm  Qualitative Research Advice Clinic  For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes 7 working days prior to the event. 
2.35 and 1.27 South Cloisters, St Luke's 

19th October 2016

**POSTPONED**

11am-12pm LKD Series - Roundtable seminar

***POSTPONED*** Alternative date TBC

Does implementation science neglect implementation in pragmatic trials?
Convened by Vashti Berry1, Sarah Morgan-Trimmer1 and Nick Axford2

Implementation science is the study of methods that promote the integration of research findings and evidence into health and social care policy and practice. It seeks to understand what support and accommodations are needed in the systems and behaviour of professionals to ensure sustainable uptake, adoption, and implementation of evidence-based interventions. The focus of implementation science to date has been closing the gap between known or demonstrated effective interventions and existing practice, in other words getting services and professionals to replicate evidence-based programmes. In this roundtable discussion seminar, we question this research focus and suggest that there is valuable implementation research to be done in the early stages of efficacy and effectiveness testing, long before interventions are ready to be scaled. This development phase in pragmatic trials, often called service design or development, involves making assessments of existing system processes and professional behavior, and either making adaptations to the intervention to fit or considering methods and strategies for influencing professional behaviour. This is an iterative process that is often neglected in the evaluation assessment. We think there is an opportunity for implementation science to discover effective (and ineffective) implementation strategies to accompany promising interventions by unpacking and studying the methods that underlie this service design process. We look forward to discussing these issues with interested colleagues.

[1 Institute of Health Research]
[2 Dartington Social Research Unit]

More Info - http://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/events//details/index.php?event=6059

To book - https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/WM36CBQ

G13, College House, St Luke's 
14th October 2016 2-3pm Institute of Health Research seminar

Why healthcare research isn’t working, and some ways to make it better

Dr Rosamund Snow
BMJ Patient Editor, and Service user researcher
Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford

Rosamund Snow is a leading researcher on involvement in health research, publishing and medical education.
Rosamund will be challenging the audience to think differently about research evidence, about the role of patients, and the role of healthcare publishing. Come prepared to ask yourself and your colleagues some tricky questions.

Welcome to a stimulating and interesting seminar on involvement, organised by the PenCLAHRC PPI team.

Email: e.j.cockcroft@exeter.ac.uk to register your interest.

Baring Court 101, St Luke's
12th October 2016 1-2pm APEx Seminar

Providing psychological care in cardiac rehabilitation settings: a tale of two halves. Findings from an updated Cochrane review, and NIHR HTA funded pilot study ‘CADENCE’

Dr Sue Richards, Senior Lecturer in Primary Care, UEMS & Deputy Director of Exeter Clinical Trials Unit

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's (with video link to Knowledge Spa, Truro – F083)
11th October 2016 10am-1pm Stats Advice Clinic

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Rod Taylor
Email: R.Taylor@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Advice Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's
10th October 2016 12.30-1.30pm Institute of Health Research (& Exeter Clinical Trials Unit) Seminar

Martin Gulliford
Professor of Public Health in the Division of Health and Social Care Research at King's College London

Efficient Trials Using Electronic Health Records

Martin Gulliford qualified in medicine from the University of Cambridge and University College Hospital, London and trained in public health and health services research at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Medical Schools London where he was a Wellcome Training Fellow in Health Services Research. For several years, he was based in Trinidad, organising a programme of health services research and training. Research interests are in epidemiology as applied to public health and health services research. Current research focuses on the use of electronic health records to evaluate public health interventions. This includes public health trials with either cluster or individual level randomisation, as well as health economic modelling studies. The main areas of application are in obesity, chronic disease prevention, ageing and antimicrobial utilisation.

For further information please contact: j.jacob@exeter.ac.uk

TBC, St Luke's
30th September 2016 10am-1pm Stats Advice Clinic

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Justin Matthews
Email: J.N.Matthews@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Advice Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke's
26th September 2016 12-1pm Institute of Health Research, Health Statistics Group

Dr Christophe Sarran
Met Office

Data mash-up: a new infrastructure for connecting health and environmental data.

A large proportion of global diseases can be linked to environmental factors, with chemical hazards, changing habitats for disease-carrying insects and community behaviours all playing a growing role. As climate change continues to drive changing weather patterns, these environmental factors are predicted to have ever greater impacts on human health and wellbeing. Yet research into the links between environmental factors and health remains fragmented, hampered by a lack of common tools and databases needed to investigate connections across a number of environmental factors and health conditions. By linking databases on climate, weather and disease, MEDMI (a novel infrastructure at the University of Exeter) is, for the first time, attempting to create a resource that will allow researchers to shed light on these complex interactions. This seminar will present the aims of the MEDMI project, the challenges encountered and how some of these were addressed. It will then present demonstration browsers for the analysis of extreme temperatures, air quality and mortality, and for the analysis of climate and infectious diseases. It will conclude with a discussion of current capabilities available and future planned developments.

Christophe Sarran is a senior Science consultant at the Met Office, supporting the health research activities of the Health Programme to achieve its targets and deliver high quality research into the links between weather and health. Specifically, this has included developing the warning service that is delivered to COPD patients, contributing to the development of the cold weather health warning service delivered to the Department of Health, the analysis of seasonal-affective disorder symptoms with respect to luminance related weather variables and the analysis of the impact of air quality on COPD patients’ health. Christophe Sarran is currently coordinating the Met Office’s health research programme.

Please email Leala Watson if you wish to attend: l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
14th September 2016  1.30-2.30pm  APEx Seminar 

Professor Paul Little
Professor of Primary Care Research within Medicine at the University of Southampton

“Nepal, Ivan Illich, and flesh-eating killer bugs: the journey of a clinical researcher”


Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/  
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's 
13th September 2016  1-2pm Insitute of Health Research Group Seminar 

Prof David Batty (UCL) will give a seminar on psychological factors and death: a bigger data approach.

Please contact Sue Bosley for further details.

 
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's 
13th September 2016  1pm PenSR Discussion Group 

Searching for grey literature.

Led by Simon Briscoe (who presented on web-searching at the Cochrane Colloquium in Vienna last year), Alison Bethel (who has recently returned from visiting the Grey Literature Report in New York), and Morwenna Rogers (who has extensive experience of locating grey literature in electronic databases). 
WK Norman (St Luke’s), Babbage 320 (Plymouth), FF16 AHC (Plymouth), F083 ECEHH (Truro) 
12th September 2016  10am-12pm  Qualitative Research Advice Clinic 

For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store:
http://store.exeter.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=45&catid=74&prodid=1421

 Please note that the Online Booking Service closes
7 working days prior to the event.

1.27, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
9th September 2016 12-1pm Seminar

The Researcher’s Guide To Getting The Most Out Of Twitter: From recruitment to impact and everything in between!

Dr Siobhan O’Dwyer is a Senior Lecturer in the University of Exeter Medical School. She has successfully used Twitter to: recruit participants; collect data; disseminate research findings; engage with industry, media, patients, and the public; and measure the impact of her research. She is also the founder of Shut Up & Write Tuesdays, an internationally recognised, Twitter-based writing group for academics.


In this seminar, Siobhan will show you how to use Twitter to strengthen all aspects of your research. Topics will include: how, when, and what to tweet; increasing your followers; using hashtags; joining communities of practice; tweeting at conferences; engaging with journalists; managing your time; and measuring your impact.

Note: This seminar assumes that you have a Twitter account and a basic understanding of how to use it. If you don’t have a Twitter account & would like to set one up, Siobhan can help you in 2.38 South Cloisters during the following times: Monday 5th September 4-5pm; Tuesday 6th September 3-4pm; Thursday 8th September 1-2pm. S.ODwyer@exeter.ac.uk

St Luke's Campus, Room TBC
21st July 2016 12-1pm Institute of Health Research Seminar

Weight Management – the Lighten Up studies and further trials

Kate Jolly is Professor of Public Health and Primary Care at the University of Birmingham. She is medically qualified and trained in both general practice and public health. Her main research interests relate to behaviour change, particularly supporting lifestyle changes and self-management of clinical conditions outside of health care settings. She undertakes research on the prevention and management of important non-communicable diseases, such as cardiovascular and respiratory conditions; behaviour change to reduce obesity and increase physical activity and supporting behaviour changes during pregnancy or after childbirth.

For further information please contact R.Taylor@exeter.ac.uk

Room 3.06, South Cloisters, St Luke's 
19th July 2016 10am-12.30pm Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic - For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes five working days prior to the event.

Room 1.27 South Cloisters, St Luke's 
14th July 2016 9.15am-4.45pm Workshop

Searching for evidence: systematic review skills workshop.

Delivered by the Evidence Synthesis Team, UEMS and PenCLAHRC.

There is an increasing recognition of systematic review methods beyond the field of medicine. This workshop is principally targeted at PhD students, and grade E & F research and teaching staff. Researchers from the College of Life and Environmental Sciences and the College of Social Sciences and International Studies are particularly welcome. The number of participants for the workshop is limited to 20.

Please email Dr Rebecca Abbott at r.a.abbott@exeter.ac.uk for further information, or to book your place on the workshop.

Further information is available from  https://mycareerzone.exeter.ac.uk/students/events/detail/417341
Room 1.23 South Cloisters, St Luke's
5th July 2016  12.30-3.30pm  Health Statistics Group - Stats Clinic  Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries. Please email to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Associate Professor Obi Ukoumunne - South Cloisters, St Luke’s
Email: O.C.Ukoumunne@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice. 
South Cloisters, St Luke’s 
5th July 2016 12-2pm Institute of Health Research Seminar

Creative Communication: Podcasts

Jane Reck
Freelance BBC radio producer, podcaster and media trainer

As part of the ‘Creative Communication: seminar and workshop series’ Jane Reck will be presenting on the use and development of podcasts (audio and visual) for research communication. Jane’s podcast work has included features for the UK Research Councils, universities across the UK, the British Library, the BBC, the Open University and the Transport Systems Catapult. As a former press officer for the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Jane is very familiar with the Impact Agenda and the importance of stressing how a piece of research is, or could potentially, benefit society and the economy. Jane’s radio features and documentaries have been broadcast on BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 5 Live, commercial radio and BBC Local Radio. In 2015 Jane was awarded a bronze at the New York International Radio Festival for Mad about the Mustang, which was narrated by Ewan McGregor.

Jane’s seminar will be complemented by Jenna Richards the University of Exeter Web and Digital Communications manager who will recap on what we have heard during the series also touching on animation and stop-motion and approaches to digital marketing.

For further information please contact R.s.whear@exeter.ac.uk

G18 EMS, St Luke's 
29th June 2016 12.30-1.30pm Realist Hive

What is real about operational research? With Sean Manzi

As someone who is relatively new to the world of operational research I was confused by the lesser consideration of what underpins the discipline than some other disciplines. Some might say “Well it is the scientific method of course” and in a loose question-avoiding way that is right, but my response would be “Which scientific method?”.

In this Realist Hive session I will first briefly introduce the discipline of operational research.  I will ask some difficult questions of the way operational research considers how it conducts research and why it is done that way. I will open the discussion out to everyone to ask ‘Is operational research a good example of the realist philosophy of science in action?’ We will likely need to go beyond this question to examine ‘Why should we consider philosophies of science at all? Do we need them?’ and ‘How do we decide just which philosophy should underpin our research?’.

Operational research, due to its lack of strong philosophical underpinning makes a good space to examine these fundamental questions of research. My hope is that this will be a provocative discussion which enables people to reflect on their own practices and beliefs.

No prior understanding of operational research or realism is required to attend this talk! In fact I implore you to attend especially if you do not know much about these topics and even more so if you take issue with any of the questions proposed above.

This will be a lively and welcoming debate; I look forward to seeing you there.

For further information, please contact Rebecca Hardwick or Mark Pearson

 SC1.23, St Luke's Campus
28th June 2016 12-2pm Institute of Health Research Seminar

Creative Communication: Infographics and motion-graphics

Dr Will Stahl-Timmins
Data Graphics Designer at the BMJ

As part of the ‘Creative Communication: seminar and workshop series’ Dr Stahl-Timmins will present on the use and development of infographics (also touching on motion-graphics and physical graphics) to communicate research messages. As The BMJ's (British Medical Journal) first Data Graphics Designer, Will designs online and print infographics, which explain scientific developments and investigative data to a busy clinical readership. Will takes copy from scientific authors, and works with the editors to visualise it, from concept through layout and coding interactivity. His career has focussed on visual communication of health research, using infographics and data visualisation techniques. Will turns raw data into engaging visual stories, so that the information can immediately be put to use by those that need it.

For further information and for details on the accompanying workshops please contact R.s.whear@exeter.ac.uk

G18 EMS, St Luke's
16th June 2016 10am-12pm Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic - For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes five working days prior to the event.

Room 1.27 South Cloisters
10th June 2016 9-11am Health Statistics Group - Stats Clinic

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries. Please email to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Associate Professor Obi Ukoumunne - South Cloisters, St Luke’s
Email: O.C.Ukoumunne@exeter.ac.uk

Attendees will be asked to complete a questionnaire prior to their Stats Clinic appointment, to enable the team to offer the best advice.

South Cloisters, St Luke’s
27th May 2016  1-2pm  Process Evaluation seminar

Designing streamlined process evaluations. Round table discussion (with introduction from Sarah Dean)

See here for slides from previous process evaluation seminars in this series. Please see the PAtH process evaluation website for resources and updates http://processevaluationatpath.wordpress.com/process-evaluation-events/ 
WK Norman, Medical School Builing, St Luke's
25th May 2016 7pm APEx: Barbara Starfield Lecture 2016

The Future of Primary Care

Professor Martin Roland CBE

For further details, please visit: http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/research/healthserv/healthservicesandpolicy/barbarastarfieldlecture/

Contact Joy Choules for further details or if you wish to book a place.

G18, St Luke's Campus
24th May 2016  2-4pm  Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic - For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes five working days prior to the event.

Room 1.27 South Cloisters
20th May 2016 10am-1pm Health Statistics Group –
Stats Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Justin Matthews - J.N.Matthews@exeter.ac.uk
South Cloisters, St Luke’s
19th May 2016 1-2pm Institute
of
Health
Research
Complex Interventions Group
Seminar

National Institute for Health Research Personal Fellowship Awards: What are they and how to get one!
Professor David Richards

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) funds research in applied health services
research to the tune of £1 billion annually. A considerable proportion of this research funding is
awarded to individuals in the form of fellowships. These fellowships fund individuals from masters
level study all the way to professorial positions, via a range of doctoral, post-doctoral, researcher
development and senior awards. Some awards are open to all, others are restricted to clinicians.
In general, the success rate for winning an award is around 20% of all applicants. If you are
thinking of applying for such an award, at any level, how will you get into this magic percentage?
Some awards are restricted to clinicians, others are open to any health scientist. What is the right
scheme for you? What are the eligibility criteria for each award? What are the shortlisters looking
for? What sorts of projects are likely to be successful? How do I identify the right supervisors,
mentors and training schemes? What is it like being interviewed? What does the panel want you to
say? How should I apply?
All these and many other questions will be answered in the seminar. If you are thinking of applying
or are a potential supervisor of an applicant this seminar is for you.

EMS Building G18, St Luke’s Campus
19th May 2016 10am-4pm PenCHORD International Symposium

Health Service Modelling Across Europe – Success Stories, Opportunities and Challenges.

This symposium will bring together health service researchers from across Germany and the UK to showcase the use of systems modelling techniques to support and improve the delivery of healthcare. We will have four talks and a panel discussion with an opportunity to facilitate learning from different settings and success stories.

This event will be free of charge, but we would appreciate your registration via http://clahrc-peninsula.nihr.ac.uk/event/penchord-international-symposium as this helps with catering.

NC12, St Luke's Campus
3rd May 2016 12.30-1.30pm Learning, Knowing, Doing seminar series

Improving the quality of care: Using Quality Improvement methodology in healthcare

Mr Rob Bethune (Colo-rectal consultant, Royal Devon & Exeter) and Dr Rosie Benneyworth (Managing Director SW Academic Health Science Network)

Please email c.hewlett@exeter.ac.uk to register your attendance
LKD Blog: http://learningknowingdoing.org.uk

Video-conferencing to Plymouth, details TBC

South Cloisters 3.06, St Luke’s
27th April 2016  1-2pm  Process Evaluation seminar  Process evaluation interactions with intervention development and delivery. Cath Quinn, Plymouth University.
See here for slides from previous process evaluation seminars in this series. Please see the PAtH process evaluation website for resources and updates http://processevaluationatpath.wordpress.com/process-evaluation-events/ 
WK Norman, Medical School Builing, St Luke's 
26th April 2016 2-4pm Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic - For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students

UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store: http://store.exeter.ac.uk/
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes five working days prior to the event.

Room 1.27 South Cloisters
21st April 2016 9.30-11.30am Exeter Clinical Trials Networking Event

Exeter Clinical Trials Support Network Event 9: CTIMPS

09:30 - Introduction to CTIMP themed ECTSN event (Rod Taylor – Acting ExeCTU Director)
09:35 - CTIMPS and sponsorship (Claire Ridler & Chris Gardner –  RD&E, NHS R&D)
09:55 - Surviving  CTIMPS and MHRA inspections (Kim Gooding – Exeter University Medical School)
10:15 - Lessons learned from conducting a CTIMP in primary care (Mary Carter & Caroline Jenkinson – Primary Care Research, UEMS)
10:35 - Multi- centre CTIMP set up (Catherine Angwin – NIHR Exeter CRF & UEMS)
10:50    Refreshments, Coffee and Cake. Speakers Q&A followed by networking
11:30    Close

Please RSVP to the CTSN Mailbox: ctsn@exeter.ac.uk

RILD Lecture Theatre, RILD Building, Barrack Road, EX2 5DW 
19th April 2016 2-4pm Health Statistics Group
Stats Clinics

Members of the Health Statistics team will be available to assist with your Stats related queries during the following sessions below – please email them individually to discuss your query or arrange an appointment.

Sue Ball - S.Ball3@exeter.ac.uk 
South Cloisters, St Luke’s 
19th April 2016  11am Webinar (PPI) 

Patient and Public Involvement: The opportunities and challenges

This is a webinar for current researchers with experience of the opportunities and challenges around patient and public involvement (PPI) in research. This webinar is aimed at current NIHR trainees and other researchers who are leading research projects and want to learn more about getting the best out of PPI.

This webinar will:

  • provide practical solutions to help to manage the opportunities and challenges in the context of your research
  • explore existing and novel methods of patient and public involvement and how to systematically address challenges
  • include a live Q&A session

The webinar will be presented by Derek Stewart OBE, Associate Director for Patient and Public Involvement at NIHR Clinical Research Network (CRN) and Paula Wray, Public Involvement Programme Lead for NIHR CLAHRC East Midlands.
You can register for the webinar via the following link: http://bit.ly/AdvancedPPIwebinar


If you have any issues when registering please email tcc@nihr.ac.uk.

 
 
19th April 2016 10am-3.30pm PenCHORD Seminar

13th PenCHORD Seminar

Our first guest speaker will be Dr David Worthington from the Department of Management Science at Lancaster University Management School. Dr Worthington will be talking about some work his team has undertaken modelling care pathways for people with bipolar disorder. He will talk about this project, and some of the challenges when trying to model the resource implications of national clinical guidelines.

Our second guest speaker will be Andrew Dobson, an independent Operational Research analyst from London. Andrew will be talking about work he has undertaken building Operational Research capacity in rural Sub-Saharan Africa. Many of you will have attended our own capacity building initiatives (such as our training programme and our workshop series), and we are very excited to hear more about how building capacity in remote rural Uganda has been helping to create impact to improve the delivery of healthcare in this region.

For our afternoon workshop session we will be running our postponed Christmas workshop looking at route optimisation. In this workshop we will show you ways in which shortest route calculations can be made for those problems where you have to visit a number of different people or places.

To register, please complete your details here

Please contact penchord@exeter.ac.uk should you have any queries

Baring Court 112, St Luke's Campus
4th April 2016 2-3pm Psychology Applied to Health
Seminar

Translational Research in Behavioural Medicine and Health Psychology
Professor Falko Sniehotta and Dr. Vera Araujo-Soares

Professor Sniehotta and Dr Araujo-Soares specialise in design and evaluation of behaviour change interventions that make a difference to the health and clinical services and have the potential to improve population health.

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/ihs/people/profile/falko.sniehotta

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/ihs/people/profile/vera.araujo-soares

For further information please contact: Marilyn Evans (Marilyn.evans@exeter.ac.uk)

Baring Court 1.28, St Luke's Campus 
23rd March 2016 1-2pm  Exeter Collaboration of Primary Care (APEx) Seminar

Key components in models of community-based interventions coordinating care in dementia: a mixed studies systematic review
Amy Backhouse, UEMS

The Clinical Practice Research Datalink: how much symptom information is lost in the free text
Sarah Price, UEMS

The Clinical Practice Research Datalink: how much symptom information is lost in the free text
Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/  
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's Campus
17th March 2016 2.00-4.00pm Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic
For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students
 
UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store here.
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes five working days prior to the event.

South Cloisters, 1.27
8th March 2016 1-2pm  Institute of Health Research Seminar

The Evaluation of Medical Tests - from results to consequences

Professor Patrick Bossuyt
Professor of Clinical Epidemiology and Head of School of Public Health at the University of Amsterdam  
Visiting International Academic Fellow to the University of Exeter

Health care professionals rely on medical tests to support diagnostic judgment and clinical decision making. Like all other interventions, these medical tests should be properly evaluated before they are introduced into clinical practice.

Overall, the evaluation of medical tests is changing, from an exclusive attention on the “trueness” of test results to a more global appraisal of the consequences of testing itself.
Payers, regulators and other decision-makers increasingly emphasize that testing should help to improve health outcomes. This shift comes with several challenges, to researchers, decision-makers, and clinicians.

For further details, please contact Chris Hyde c.j.hyde@exeter.ac.uk who is hosting Patrick’s visit

NC12, North Cloisters, St Luke's Campus
7th March 2016 12-1pm Health Economics Group Seminar

** Event cancelled**

On cost effectiveness analysis and person-centred healthcare

Professor Andrea Manca
Professor of Health Economics at the University of York

Andrea is Professor of Health Economics at the University of York and Visiting Scientist at the Luxembourg Institute of Health. His current research interests focus on the development and application of health economics methods to facilitate the evaluation of person-centred healthcare technologies. He is a member of NICE Technology Appraisal Committee and co-editor of the journal PLOS One.

For further information please contact l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
1st March 2016  2-3.30pm Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC)
Seminar 
Illustrating uncertainty in extrapolating evidence for cost-effectiveness modelling
Dr Laura Bojke
Senior Research Fellow
Centre for Health Economics, University of York
Laura completed her PhD in 2008 ‘Characterising structural uncertainty within decision analytic models’, and currently works in the CLAHRC for Yorkshire and Humber as part of the Health Economics and Measurement team.

Expert elicitation in informing temporal uncertainty: effect of expert characteristics on perception of uncertainty
Dina Jankovic
PhD student
Centre for Health Economics, University of York
Dina holds an MSc in Health Economics and her research focuses on elicitation of experts’ opinion as a tool for assessment of health technologies at early stages of development.

For further information please contact Jaime Peters (j.peters@exeter.ac.uk)
JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
24th February 2016 1-2pm

Exeter Collaboration of Primary Care (APEx) Seminar

Patient feedback: useful in transforming primary care?

Professor John Campbell, Professor of General Practice & Primary Care, University of Exeter Medical School and Director, APEx

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
23rd February 2016 1-2pm

PenSR Discussion Group

Patient and Public Involvement in systematic reviews: opportunities and challenges (Kate Boddy and Kristin Liabo)

WK Norman (Exeter), Babbage 320 and AHC FF16 (Plymouth), F083 (Truro)
22nd February 2016 12.30-1.30pm

Health Statistics Group Seminar

Use of Bayesian multivariate meta-analysis to inform decision making in HTA
Dr Sylwia Bujkiewicz
University of Leicester

Dr Sylwia Bujkiewicz is a Lecturer in Biostatistics in the Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester. Her background is in Applied Mathematics and Medical Statistics. She previously held research and academic posts at Wroclaw University of Technology, University of Nottingham and University of Leicester. She joined the Biostatistics Research Group in Leicester as a lecturer in 2011 and her role focuses on research of Bayesian multi-parameter evidence synthesis methodology and the application of such methods to modelling surrogate endpoints.

Please email Leala Watson if you wish to attend: l.k.watson@exeter.ac.uk

JS07 Smeall Building, St Luke’s Campus
3rd February 2016 1-2pm

Process Evaluation seminar

Open Session

Open Sessions will be round-table discussions on different aspects of process evaluation, including: progress of participants’ current process evaluations; peer advice on process evaluation design and methods; lessons learned from previous studies; process evaluation resources such as upcoming events/conferences/training; new studies and publications.

The content of these sessions will be flexible and open to what participants want to discuss. If you have any requests for particular content to be covered that you want to specify in advance of a session, please contact Sarah at s.morgan-trimmer@exeter.ac.uk. Otherwise just show up!

See here for slides from previous process evaluation seminars in this series. Please see the PAtH process evaluation website for resources and updates http://processevaluationatpath.wordpress.com/process-evaluation-events/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke's
2nd February 2016 2-4pm Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic
For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students
 
UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store here.
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes five working days prior to the event.

South Cloisters, 1.27 
22nd January 2016 1-2pm Seminar

A school based cluster RCT of CBT to prevent anxiety: Statistical and Methodological considerations.

Dr Gordon Taylor
Reader in Medical Statistics at the University of Bath and the Bath lead for the Research Design Service South West (RDS-SW).

Dr Gordon Taylor is a member of the NIHR RfPB South Central funding panel and the Doctoral Research Fellowship (DRF) committee and has been a member or chair of a large number of National and European DMECs and TSCs.  He has also has previously spent seven years as chair of the Research ethics committee for Wales.

Dr Taylor has been lead statistician on many randomised controlled trials both academic and commercial mainly in the areas of children and older adults.  However, he has two main areas of research interest.  The first brings together his knowledge of research ethics and research design methodology and is the ethics of designs such as cluster randomised trials, stepped wedge and open label extension studies.   The second is his interest in the health of the NHS workforce investigating issues as varied as ‘what happens when doctors are patients?’ to ‘Why do GPs leave general practice early?’

For further information please contact R.Taylor@exeter.ac.uk
JS07 Smeall Building, St Lukes Campus
20th January 2016 1-2pm Exeter Collaboration of Primary Care (APEx) Seminar Dr Helen Lloyd, Senior Research Fellow, PenCLAHRC

“Integrating service design, evaluation and research: a strategy to improve person-centred coordinated care”

The work presented will be situated within the broader context of the collaborative programme of work she is leading for PenCLAHRC on person-centred coordinated care for older people with complex health and social needs

Contact Joy Choules j.l.choules@exeter.ac.uk 01392 722743 http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/apex/seminars/

JS07, Smeall Building, St Luke’s Campus

(with video link to Knowledge Spa, Truro)

20th January 2016 10am-12pm Qualitative Research Advice Clinic

Qualitative Research Advice Clinic
For PenCLAHRC and IHR Staff and Students
 
UEMS qualitative researchers will be available to give face-to-face advice and signposting for your qualitative research queries.

Please book a time via the UEMS store here.
 
Please note that the Online Booking Service closes five working days prior to the event.

South Cloisters, 1.47
14th January 2016 10am-5pm Workshop

Searching and beyond: the Librarian’s role in systematic reviews.

A one day workshop for librarians and information professionals on the systematic review process. Helping you help your users.

Are you being asked more and more about systematic reviews? Information professionals play a vital role within the process and our course is designed specifically for you and delivered by an experienced team of information specialists and reviewers.

Booking for this event is now closed.

Exploration Lab 1, The Forum, Streatham Campus
13th January 2016 12.30-1.30pm Learning, Knowing, Doing seminar series Patterns of GP prescribing behaviour: Insights into GPs’ adoption of innovations
Professor Philip Stern, University of Exeter Business School

Since the landmark paper in Sociometry by Colman, Katz and Menzel in 1957, researchers have utilised concepts based upon social networks and  social integration to explain the diffusion of medical innovations. This research revisits these efforts as well as a footnote in the original work which indicated that prescription frequency was more important than social integration in the speed of adoption. We present evidence from the launch of 36 new pharmaceuticals in the UK.

Philip has been researching GP prescribing behaviour since 1990 and his doctorate applied stochastic modelling to GP prescribing. He holds a visiting Professorship at the Ehrenberg-Bass Institute at the University of South Australia.

Please email c.hewlett@exeter.ac.uk to register your attendance

LKD Blog: http://learningknowingdoing.org.uk
2.13, South Cloisters, St Luke's Campus