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Sarah Buckingham

PhD student

01872 258160

Knowledge Spa Research Office 4, European Ce

Since completing my degree in Human Biology with Psychology in 2007 I have been interested in various aspects of health and disease.  I have worked for the NHS in various roles including research and clinical coding.  I completed my masters by research in Applied Health Studies in 2013; this involved collaborating with the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Primary Care Trust Public Health team to research suicide in the 75+ age group in Cornwall.

I was delighted to be offered a PhD studentship with the University of Exeter and Devon & Cornwall Police Force, which I began in October 2016.

Outside of work, my interests include walking, the countryside, playing the keyboard, singing with a choir and keeping chickens!

Research

Research interests

Broadly speaking, my research interests include the biological, psychological, social and environmental influences on health and wellbeing.  I am particularly interested in behaviour change interventions for healthy lifestyles, electronic and mobile health, public health and epidemiology and psychological outcomes (e.g. stress, anxiety and depression).

My PhD is entitled “Occupational Health, Wearable Devices and Organisational Wellness in the Police Force”.  I am working with the Devon & Cornwall Police and Dorset Police to research the effectiveness of a workplace mobile health intervention (a wearable activity monitor and ‘Bupa Boost’ smartphone app).  Using a mixed methods approach, I will look at the impact of the intervention on physical activity levels, as well as the wider effects on general health, wellbeing, stress and productivity within the police force.

The PhD is supervised by Dr. Karyn Morrissey (ECEHH), Dr. Andrew James Williams (ECEHH), Dr. Lisa Price (School of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Exeter) and Prof. John Harrison (Devon & Cornwall Police).  The project is funded by the University of Exeter Medical School and Devon & Cornwall Police Force.

Publications

Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation: abridged Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis. 
Buckingham SA, Taylor RS, Jolly K, Zawada A, Dean SG, Cowie A, Norton RJ, Dalal HM. Open Heart. 2016 Sep 14;3(2):e000463.

Rehabilitation Enablement in Chronic Heart Failure-a facilitated self-care rehabilitation intervention in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (REACH-HFpEF) and their caregivers: rationale and protocol for a single-centre pilot randomised controlled trial.
Eyre V, Lang CC, Smith K, Jolly K, Davis R, Hayward C, Wingham J, Abraham C, Green C, Warren FC, Britten N, Greaves CJ, Doherty P, Austin J, Van Lingen R, Singh S, Buckingham S, Paul K, Taylor RS, Dalal HM; REACH-HF investigators. BMJ Open. 2016 Oct 25;6(10):e012853.

Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Rehabilitation Enablement in Chronic Heart Failure (REACH-HF) facilitated self-care rehabilitation intervention in heart failure patients and caregivers: rationale and protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial. Taylor RS, Hayward C, Eyre V, Austin J, Davies R, Doherty P, Jolly K, Wingham J, Van Lingen R, Abraham C, Green C, Warren FC, Britten N, Greaves CJ, Singh S, Buckingham S, Paul K, Dalal H; REACH-HF Investigators. BMJ Open. 2015 Dec 23;5(12):e009994.

Optimising self-care support for people with heart failure and their caregivers: development of the Rehabilitation Enablement in Chronic Heart Failure (REACH-HF) intervention using intervention mapping
Colin J. Greaves, Jennifer Wingham, Carolyn Deighan, Patrick Doherty, Jennifer Elliott, Wendy Armitage, Michelle Clark, Jackie Austin, Charles Abraham, Julia Frost, Sally Singh, Kate Jolly, Kevin Paul, Louise Taylor, Sarah Buckingham, Russell Davis, Hasnain Dalal, Rod S. Taylor and on behalf of the REACH-HF investigators. Pilot and Feasibility Studies. 2016 2:37

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