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Dr Jo Day

Dr Jo Day

Research Fellow

6089

South Cloisters 

I am a psychologist and qualitative researcher with project management experience. I joined the National Institute for Health Research CLAHRC South West Peninsula (PenCLAHRC) at the University of Exeter Medical School in 2012.

I currently work on 2 projects. First, the Care Home Implementation and Knowledge mobilisation Project (CHIK-P) which aims to develop our understanding of how to implement best practice and share knowledge in residential care settings with the aim of improving the health and social care of residents.

Second, Analysing implementation in Acute Stroke and Patient Initiated Clinics (ASPIC) where we seek to gain insights into the implementation processes of two South West Academic Health Science and PenCLAHRC supported interventions.

Previously I worked on the internal evaluation of the pilot phase of PenCLAHRC which used a participatory realist evaluation approach to examine how closer collaboration between academics and clinicians promoted knowledge translation.  

Prior PenCLAHRC I worked as forensic and independent psychologist completing my PhD in 2012 in Sports and Health Sciences at Exeter. This was a narrative life story study exploring adults’ experience of transforming a criminal lifestyle and the role of identity, embodiment, ageing and physical activity within a strengths-based framework.      

 

Qualifications

  • BA(Hons) Social Psychology
  • MSc Applied Criminological Psychology
  • PhD Sport and Health Sciences
  • Health & Care Professions Council Registered Forensic Psychologist
  • Chartered Forensic Psychologist
  • Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society

Career

Forensic Psychologist working in criminal justice for 12 years, roles included: 

  • Development, evaluation and quality assurance of evidence-based interventions for people with criminal convictions
  • Senior manager and supervision of staff within multi-disciplinary teams
  • Clinical work in one to one, group and therapeutic community settings
  • Risk assessment and expert witness

Research

Research interests

  • Qualitative research
  • Knowledge mobilisation / translation, implementation science and improvement 
  • Evaluation of interventions in health and social care and criminal justice settings
  • Health, well-being, social exclusion and the role of sport and physical activity
  • Patient and public involvement and engagement in research 

Research projects

  • The internal evaluation of NIHR CLAHRC South West Peninsula (PenCLAHRC)
  • CHIK-P: the Care Homes Implementation and Knowledge Mobilisation Project
  • ASPIC: Gaining insights into the implementation processes of two interventions (acute stroke and patient initaited clinics) supported by the South West Academic Health Science Network and PenCLAHRC  

Links


Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Publications by category


Journal articles

Heaton J, Day J, Britten N (In Press). Collaborative research and the co-production of knowledge: an illustrative case study of knowledge translation. Implementation Science, 11(20). Full text.
Heaton J, Day J, Britten N (In Press). Inside the "black box" of a knowledge translation program in applied health research. Qualitative Health Research Abstract.
Sparkes AC, Day J (2016). Aging bodies and desistance from crime: Insights from the life stories of offenders. J Aging Stud, 36, 47-58. Abstract.  Author URL.
Day J, Heaton J, Britten N (2016). What is the nature and value of a risk management tool in a large-scale complex programme of collaborative applied health research?. Health, Risk and Society, 18(1-2), 97-113. Full text.
Burrowes N, Day J (2011). Offender experiences and opinions of mixed-gender group work in the community: a qualitative study. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 55(7), 1154-1165.
Day J (2001). Understanding the characteristics of fire-setters. Prison Service Journal, 133, 6-8.

Chapters

Day J (2007). Psychological theories of criminality. In Parker M (Ed) Dynamic security: the therapeutic community in prison, London: Jessica Kingsley, 46-58.

Conferences

Day J (2014). Leaving a criminal lifestyle: a journey from ‘what works’ to ‘how it works’. Invited speaker at British Psychology Society South West Psychology in the Pub.
Day J, Sparkes AC (2014). ‘When you stop you’ve got no identity’: the (re)construction of narrative identity and the implications for understanding desistance from crime. Troubling Narratives: Identity Matters.
Day J, Sparkes AC (2013). Insights from a narrative study of the rehabilitative role of physical activity in leaving a criminal life and enhancing well-being. British Psychological Society Division of Sport and Exercise Psychology.
Day J, Sparkes AC (2011). Sporting criminal to sporting citizen: Embodied identity change and the rehabilitative role of physical activity. Annual Congress of European College of Sport Science.
Day J, Sparkes AC (2010). A criminal life transformed: Reflections on an inter-disciplinary qualitative inquiry. International Qualitative Research Conference.
Day J, Bloomfield S (2008). Critical factors of the effective implementation of offending behaviour programmes: a review and implications. European Association of Psychology and Law conference.

Reports

Day J, Bloomfield S (2007). Critical factors that impact on the effective implementation of offending behaviour programmes: a review. National Offender Management Service.

Publications by year


In Press

Heaton J, Day J, Britten N (In Press). Collaborative research and the co-production of knowledge: an illustrative case study of knowledge translation. Implementation Science, 11(20). Full text.
Heaton J, Day J, Britten N (In Press). Inside the "black box" of a knowledge translation program in applied health research. Qualitative Health Research Abstract.

2016

Sparkes AC, Day J (2016). Aging bodies and desistance from crime: Insights from the life stories of offenders. J Aging Stud, 36, 47-58. Abstract.  Author URL.
Day J, Heaton J, Britten N (2016). What is the nature and value of a risk management tool in a large-scale complex programme of collaborative applied health research?. Health, Risk and Society, 18(1-2), 97-113. Full text.

2014

Day J (2014). Leaving a criminal lifestyle: a journey from ‘what works’ to ‘how it works’. Invited speaker at British Psychology Society South West Psychology in the Pub.
Day J, Sparkes AC (2014). ‘When you stop you’ve got no identity’: the (re)construction of narrative identity and the implications for understanding desistance from crime. Troubling Narratives: Identity Matters.

2013

Day J, Sparkes AC (2013). Insights from a narrative study of the rehabilitative role of physical activity in leaving a criminal life and enhancing well-being. British Psychological Society Division of Sport and Exercise Psychology.

2011

Burrowes N, Day J (2011). Offender experiences and opinions of mixed-gender group work in the community: a qualitative study. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 55(7), 1154-1165.
Day J, Sparkes AC (2011). Sporting criminal to sporting citizen: Embodied identity change and the rehabilitative role of physical activity. Annual Congress of European College of Sport Science.

2010

Day J, Sparkes AC (2010). A criminal life transformed: Reflections on an inter-disciplinary qualitative inquiry. International Qualitative Research Conference.

2008

Day J, Bloomfield S (2008). Critical factors of the effective implementation of offending behaviour programmes: a review and implications. European Association of Psychology and Law conference.

2007

Day J, Bloomfield S (2007). Critical factors that impact on the effective implementation of offending behaviour programmes: a review. National Offender Management Service.
Day J (2007). Psychological theories of criminality. In Parker M (Ed) Dynamic security: the therapeutic community in prison, London: Jessica Kingsley, 46-58.

2001

Day J (2001). Understanding the characteristics of fire-setters. Prison Service Journal, 133, 6-8.

I currently teach in the areas of: 

  • Qualitative research
  • Critical appraisal of qualtiative research 
  • Implementation science and knowledge mobilisation / translation 

I co-supervise 1 PhD student 

I co-ordinate and deliver with colleagues the Qualitative Research Advice clinics

 

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